Typo 9010 — Czech digitized typefaces 1990—2010
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    8 texts, 103 designers, 399 fonts, 288 pages, 1902 styles, 9010. Typo 9010 summarizes the history of the Czech digitized fonts between 1990 and 2… Read More
    8 texts, 103 designers, 399 fonts, 288 pages, 1902 styles, 9010. Typo 9010 summarizes the history of the Czech digitized fonts between 1990 and 2010, and also acts as a specimen. Unlike traditional specimens, it can be read continuously from beginning to end. Zuzana Lednická used the texts of Petr Babák, Filip Blažek, Veronika Burian, Karel Haloun, Ondřej Chorý, Bas Jacobs, Pavel Noga, Jan Solpera and František Štorm to show alphabets in an actual typesetting. Even though some fonts tried to fight it and the setting is far from your standard setting, the fonts show what’s in them better than on a quick fox jumping over a regular specimen and simultaneously reading the texts is more fun than in a sober design of any academic publication. What’s more, chronological order naturally brings together fonts that would otherwise hardly meet. Combinations of Regent by František Štorm or Mongoloid by Ondřej Chorý with Cubist edges of Reflex by Aleš Najbrt work to your surprise. The whole thing e Read Less
    Published:
Typo 9010 — Czech digitized typefaces 1990—2010

2015
Client: Biggboss
Cooperation: Petra Dočekalová (typeface), Radek Sidun (typeface), Tomáš Brousil (typeface)
Type: Book


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8 texts, 103 designers, 399 fonts, 288 pages, 1902 styles, 9010. Typo 9010 summarizes the history of the Czech digitized fonts between 1990 and 2010, and also acts as a specimen. Unlike traditional specimens, it can be read continuously from beginning to end. Zuzana Lednická used the texts of Petr Babák, Filip Blažek, Veronika Burian, Karel Haloun, Ondřej Chorý, Bas Jacobs, Pavel Noga, Jan Solpera and František Štorm to show alphabets in an actual typesetting. Even though some fonts tried to fight it and the setting is far from your standard setting, the fonts show what’s in them better than on a quick fox jumping over a regular specimen and simultaneously reading the texts is more fun than in a sober design of any academic publication. What’s more, chronological order naturally brings together fonts that would otherwise hardly meet. Combinations of Regent by František Štorm or Mongoloid by Ondřej Chorý with Cubist edges of Reflex by Aleš Najbrt work to your surprise. The whole thing ends with one really big, beautiful period from LSNY by Petr Bosák.