PLANT GROW EAT LOVE
As featured on Design Ignites Change:
http://www.designigniteschange.org/projects/146-plant-grow-eat-love
In 2007, Detroit was labeled a food desert. A food desert is an area that has no or very distant mainstream grocers. In most cities, food deserts are isolated districts or neighborhoods. Detroit is Americas 11th largest city. There is not a single grocery store chain within the city limits.

plant grow eat love addresses this issue of Detroits limited accessibility to grocery stores and fresh foods. After conducting ethnographic research in downtown Detroit, we discovered many locals were open to the idea of gardening but lacked the resources.

Our solution was to teach people to grow their own fresh produce indoors using recycled 2-liter bottles. The project consisted of an installation and workshop, where we distributed window gardens and taught locals how to make their own. We distributed packets with recipes, local garden info and plant care tips.
2-Liter Bottles recycled and reused as planters for a window garden.
Our team collected and cut pop bottles to use as pots and irrigation for plants.
We planted, watered, and labeled each bottle.
As a part of the education process, we gathered and designed recipe cards that utilized each vegetable, instructions for care, and packaged them in a silk screened envelope.
We also collected old t-shirts and silk screened the plant grow eat love identity onto each as a promotional item for the event.
In partnership with the Boll Family YMCA and a local community garden, we gave away our pre-made planters as an invitation to the window garden workshop the following day.
Our workshop the following day was a great success and a lot of fun. Members of the community joined us as we demonstrated the nutrition and financial benefits of growing your own produce at home. Everyone who attended walked away with a t-shirt, plants, and recipes.
Happy sprouts in the dead of winter!
PLANT GROW EAT LOVE
117
8099
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Published:

PLANT GROW EAT LOVE

plant grow eat love addresses this issue of Detroit’s limited accessibility to grocery stores and fresh foods.
117
8099
3
Published:

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