The objective of this project was to create two posters that listed typographic crimes. We’re sometimes naturally aware of them and sometimes not. The purpose is to help us, new designers or regular folk, become aware and understand type crimes. While the idea was fun to explore, the limitations for the layout we would have to discuss. One poster could only consist of one color plus black and or white with type size and typeface limitations and the other was limited by the amount of typefaces and so on. We weren’t allowed to use imagery and everything about the poster had to make sense. To new designers, that’s not all that easy. 
After reviewing the limitations, the major one for me being no imagery, I cried. I didn’t, but the hurt did ignite the urge to find the perfect genre of inspiration art. Totally oblivious, I asked a fellow classmate what was their point of reference and he screamed from the mountain tops Swiss posters. At first I was super excited because I had recently watched Helvetica the documentary and I was like yeah Swiss, but then my professor introduced me to a lot of other stuff and my inspiration turned to Dada typography posters. For the poster that I would submit for printing my reference was Dada posters, but for the super limited green poster you see I primarily focused on negative space and cleanliness. I didn’t go crazy either. 
Step by step, day by day...okay, what was the process? I mentioned above I was oblivious and that’s true. Using InDesign for like the first time I was able to gain magical powers and produce SOMETHING! *cheers to freaking weekend* So, after experimenting with the layouts and going back and forth between Swiss posters and Dadaism I was able to formulate a method that helped with both posters. Like the Swiss, I focused on negative space and appropriate use of the grid with the green one. I was able to create 3 levels or more of visual hierarchy that was presumably bold and eye catching. With the other, I use my irrational thought process to fuel my intent. I originally chose and back in a the day, monochromatic, simple look. They say your first idea isn’t usually your best and when it wasn't, I kept experimenting with design, visual hierarchy, color, etc. until the end. It was a fight. 
In conclusion, I learned, once again, the value in effort. I learned a lot about the content I was trying to explain. I learned preventative methods to keep me from making cliche mistakes. I learned how to pay attention to detail more and how to research. I learned how to make sense of everything. I can’t say that I was loyal to that before. 
Type Crimes
0
42
0
Published:

Type Crimes

0
42
0
Published:

Tools

Creative Fields