The problem

Pure Rain is a line of garden watering tools with innovative nanobubble technology. Their products add millions of microscopic nanobubbles to ordinary tap water to help your plants absorb nutrients quickly, making them healthier, stronger, and more disease-resistant.

As a new product line on the market, they approached Forty for help with packaging design. If you’ve ever walked down the gardening aisle at the local hardware store, you’re familiar with the homogenous look of all the products. It’s a sea of greens and yellows with cheesy pictures and messaging that all says the same thing.

We wanted to help Pure Rain develop a brand that would catch shoppers’ eyes and introduce them to tools that could transform their garden.

The solution

Planting roots for a strong brand

Our team started out by planting deep roots (no pun intended) for the Pure Rain brand. Throughout all of our conversations with their team, the concept of building a life without chemicals kept coming up. Their style is natural (of course), but it also felt bold, intelligent, and global – not like your typical ho-hum gardening tools.

Keeping in mind this style and the overall experience they wanted to create for their customers, we took Pure Rain through our in-depth research and branding process, and realized that the company felt a lot like NASA. However, even though NASA is innovative, futuristic, and smart, it felt clunky compared to Pure Rain’s sleek and user-friendly tools. To combine these two ideas, we decided to use an idealized version of NASA as their brand concept and inspiration — almost like how NASA would be if Steve Jobs was in charge.

Finding the perfect names

After solidifying the foundations of the brand, our team got to work on product naming and packaging. We used the idealized NASA concept to inspire each of the product names and immediately provide the customer with a mental picture of what the product would help them do. The long, extending watering wand became the “Reach,” and the ground sprinkler became the “Station.”

Designing the total package

With names and branding in place, we were ready to get to work on the packaging. Our goal with these packages was to make them look totally different than anything else in the garden aisle. While most other products are green and yellow, Pure Rain is stark white. It also looks a lot more futuristic than other clunky or standard tools. The clean colors and techie design are a lot more eye-catching than its traditional competitors.

Creating a space-age site


The packages also have a QR code to direct people to Pure Rain’s website for more information, so it was time to start building this site. Our goal was to show people what’s different about these tools and incite them to buy one to try it out. We also wanted to tell their story so that the company could use the site when pitching the products to retailers. We extended the style of the packaging to the web experience with lots of white, vivid pictures, and a futuristic feel. It also includes videos to show the tools in action, a blog with gardening tips and advice, and information on where to find the products at a store near you.

We’re continuing to help Pure Rain grow their presence and make their brand bloom, but in the meantime, check them out at a Target or Lowe’s near you!
Color palette and visual elements
New website viewed on tablet
New packaging for Pure Rain watering products, designed to jump out from the browns and greens of the gardening aisle
Graphics illustrating the product's benefits
An early mockup for the Pure Rain packaging, before we had even named the product
Pure Rain
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Pure Rain

Forty helped Pure Rain grow their presence and make their brand bloom,
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