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    The Cost of Consumption sheds light on the impact of human plastic and seafood consumption on coral health. Viewers are encouraged to think criti… Read More
    The Cost of Consumption sheds light on the impact of human plastic and seafood consumption on coral health. Viewers are encouraged to think critically about how much they consume, and are given resources to lessen plastic usage and make more sustainable seafood choices. By 2050, corals worldwide are projected to have died out. Will your consumption make that date come sooner or later? This project was exhibited as a part of Rice University’s Art & Environment Spring 2017 class, under the guidance of Adrienne Correa, Lina Dib, Maureen Haver, and Tony Day. Tasked to create anything involving coral reefs, I chose an activist approach to my project by making and placing coral sculptures (covered in expiration date stickers) around a grocery store, plus handing out informational cards bearing information on overfishing and plastic use. I made the coral sculptures by hand, created the Cost of Consumption logo, and set the layout of recipes and nutrition labels with researched information. Read Less
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The Cost of Consumption
How can design help people think about plastic and seafood consumption, and its ties to coral health?
The Cost of Consumption sheds light on the impact of human plastic and seafood consumption on coral health. Viewers are encouraged to think critically about how much they consume, and are given resources to lessen plastic usage and make more sustainable seafood choices. By 2050, corals worldwide are projected to have died out. Will your consumption make that date come sooner or later?
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Tasked to create anything involving coral reefs, I chose an activist approach to my project by shedding light on the impact of human plastic and seafood consumption on coral health. In order to do this, I made coral sculptures covered in expiration date stickers, then placed them around a local grocery store and an art exhibition. Informational cards bearing facts on overfishing and plastic use were also handed out, complete with QR codes so that viewers were linked with resources on picking sustainable seafood and decreasing plastic usage. I made the coral sculptures by hand using plaster and chicken wire, created the Cost of Consumption logo, and set the layout of recipes and nutrition labels with researched information. 
Receipts with plastic consumption information
This project was exhibited as a part of Rice University’s Art & Environment Spring 2017 class, under the guidance of Adrienne Correa, Lina Dib, Maureen Haver, and Tony Day.