Celebrate Canada 150
Celebrate Canada 150

Copy / Design

Home to CanaDAD Justin Trudeau, the most donut shops per capita, and enough #sorry to fuel world peace, Canada is home to many diverse people and unique traditions.  You're invited to celebrate Canada's 150th birthday with daily Canadian timbits of knowledge. Continue the part-eh on instagram!​​​​​​​
JUSTIN TRUDEAU
Dear world, you’re welcome. Sincerely, Canada. On this Father’s Day, while we celebrate all the dads and father figures in our lives, let’s send some extra props to our beloved Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, our CanaDAD and our favourite Justin. Being the second youngest prime minister of our country, Trudeau is also the eldest son of former Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau. From lowering taxes on the middle class, creating a national public inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women in Canada to resettling over 25,000 Syrian refugees, creating gender equality within the Cabinet of Canada and more, Trudeau runs the country with class, all while being an outstanding family man and role model. If you want to keep up with our favourite CanaDAD, check out the TrudeauMeter, to see all of his incredible accomplishments or just bask in the glory of his great hair…what…it’s True…deau!
MAPLE SYRUP
This Sunday Funday get your brunch on with golden, delicious, Canadian maple syrup! Did you know that 91% of the world’s maple syrup supply comes from Quebec? Drizzle this Canadian favourite over fluffy French toast or crispy bacon! Incroyable! Maple syrup is so popular that it’s recently become a “superfood”, according to The Federation of Quebec Maple Syrup Producers. Guess you’ve got more incentive to drown those waffles in golden goodness! Fun fact: some say Canadian bank bills smell like maple! No wonder the maple leaf is a Canadian icon!
TOUQUE
During our blustery winter months, bad hair days, or typical brisk Spring mornings, toques have kept Canadian noggins toasty and stylish since the late 1800's. Touques were originally worn by the couriers de bois, French and Métis fur traders and late made popular by Bob and Doug McKenzie of the SCTV comedy sketch The Great White North. These comfy knit hats are often worn for at least 6-7 months out of the year and either boast Canadian team logos, are adorned with a big pom pom, or showcase our Canadian pride. Touque cool, eh?  
CN TOWER
What opened to the public June 26, 1976, stands at 1,815 feet high and is Drake’s favourite place to get Views from The6ix? The CN Tower of course! Toronto is home to the world’s 9th tallest free-standing structure. The Canadian National Railway wanted to create a TV and radio communication platform to serve the Toronto area and showcase the strength of Canadian industry. Today, visitors can enjoy all the CN Tower has to offer: spy on a Blue Jay’s game, run up 1776 stairs for charity, eat at its delicious rotating restaurant, treat yourself to the world’s highest wine cellar, jump on the glass floor (which can withstand the weight of 35 moose) and feel the thrill of walking (or hanging off the edge) via the EdgeWalk experience. Look Ma, no hands!

BAGGED MILK
Got bagged milk? Glass bottles were replaced with bagged milk in 1967 as a lighter and sturdier alternative. In 1979, the key-shaped bag opener with a clip and magnet was invented in Toronto. These openers made opening milk safer than slipping the bag into pitchers with built-in openers. Canadians don’t cry over spilled milk unless the bag is accidentally cut by the built-in opener and all your milk comes out the bottom. Not cool, amirite? I recommend getting the nifty bag opener that doubles as a fridge magnet. It’s a great conversation starter and party favour for all the milk-lovers in your life. 
HUDSON’S BAY BLANKET
Dreary Spring weather calls for cuddling up with a great book and this cosy Canadian icon. First introduced in 1780, the Hudson’s Bay Company wool point blankets were traded to First Nations people in exchange for beaver pelts, buffalo robes, pemmican or moccasins. The short black lines, which are roughly four inches long, are a “point” system established by mid-18th-century French weavers to indicate the blanket’s size. The simplistic colour palette reflected the colourfast dyes used at the time. For First Nations, the colours had symbolic meanings: green represented new life, red symbolized battle or the hunt, yellow indicated the harvest or sun and blue connoted water. 
WINNIE-THE-POOH
Our story begins at a train station in White River, Ontario with a Canadian soldier and veterinarian named Harry Colebourn. Harry was on his way to Quebec to meet his fellow soldiers who were going overseas for World War I. Before he left the station, Harry decided to buy a little black bear, which he called “Winnipeg Bear” after his hometown. Winnie, actually a little girl cub, joined Harry and his troops, the 2nd Canadian Infantry Brigade on their way to England. When it was time for the brigade to continue on to France, Harry received an order that he couldn’t bring Winnie along. In the meantime, Winnie stayed at the London Zoo where she became a fast favourite with the visitors. Because Winnie was such a gentle bear, some of the children would ride on her back and feed her corn syrup and condensed milk. Two of Winnie’s most popular visitors happened to be A.A. Milne and his son Christopher Robin! Christopher Robin loved Winnie so much that he named his teddy bear after her and his friend’s pet swan, “Pooh”. Inspired by Christopher Robin’s great love for Winnie the bear and his stuffed animal collection, A.A. Milne wrote and published the Winnie-the-Pooh children’s storybook about their adventures. In the wise words of Winnie-the-Pooh, “You’re braver than you believe, stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think.”  
CANADIAN TUXEDO
Denim on denim on denim on denim. For Canadians, denim in Spring, or any other time of the year is a wardrobe staple. This ensemble includes a jean jacket or vest and denim jeans. If you’re feeling particularly blue, throw on a button down denim shirt too! Prairie-dwelling Canadians usually add a cowboy hat to top off their look. Denim has existed for around 140 years and started as a workwear innovation for field workers. Legend has it, the term, "Canadian Tuxedo", originated from American crooner, Bing Crosby, who was allegedly denied entrance into a Canadian hotel in 1951 due to his entirely denim attire. Crosby’s friends contacted Levi Strauss and Co to custom make a denim tuxedo jacket so he could rock the denim look anywhere he went. Fancy that! Grab a Timmy’s double-double and pull on some double denim!
WORLD'S LARGEST TOTEM POLE
June is National Aboriginal History Month where Canada celebrates the strong and vibrant culture of out First Nations communities. Canada is home to 1.4 million indigenous people from the First Nations, Inuit and Métis cultures. Aboriginal people symbolize their ongoing survival and resistance to cultural and territorial infringement by carving and erecting totem poles. Each pole is hand carved and painted to symbolize historical family lineage, community membership and cultural identity. Poles can also be created as memorial or heraldic poles, grave figures, house posts, house front or portal poles, welcoming poles and mortuary poles. Standing at a whopping 173ft tall, the largest totem pole resides in Albert Bay, British Columbia! This totem pole represents different factions of the Kwakwaka’wakw people who live on the northern Vancouver Island and the mainland. The Kwakwaka’wakw origin stories tell of ancestors coming into their community in the forms of animals by land, sea and underground, and upon arriving became human. Their totem pole design features the Sun Man, a whale, an old man, a wolf, the Thunderbird and its cousin, the Kulusł, a two-headed serpent, a bear holding a salmon and a raven holding copper. Happy National Aboriginal History Month, Canada!

CORNUS CANADENSIS
Canada has a national animal and many icons but did you know until July 1, 2017, we didn’t have a national flower? Winning 80% of the online survey votes, we celebrate the bunchberry (aka Cornus Canadensis) as our new national flower. The Cornus Canadensis is commonly known as the bunchberry, crackerberry, creeping dogwood, dwarf cornel and quarter-temps en français. This little gem beat out the Twinflower and Hooded lady’s tresses in the competition. The Cornus Canadensis can be found all across the country growing wild carpeting the ground. In the late spring, white flowers blossoms, in the summer, little red berries pop up and in the fall, the plant’s leaves turns a beautiful red. Keep an eye out for these little nature nuggets on your next hike in the woods!
Celebrate Canada 150
7
209
0
Published:

Celebrate Canada 150

7
209
0
Published:

Creative Fields