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    "Proximity Studies" is the culmination of a series of "proximity" related experiments written in Processing (processing.org) over the past few mo… Read More
    "Proximity Studies" is the culmination of a series of "proximity" related experiments written in Processing (processing.org) over the past few months. We were interested to see what forms would emerge, when points, arranged in rigid structures are distorted, corrupted, transformed or displaced. Points are initially structured in lines, grids, particle fields, concentric circles & spheres. At each frame of the animation, we check neighbouring points to see if they are "in range". If so, we draw a line. As we we corrupt those structures, for example by moving rings of points apart, or displacing points on a grid, old bonds disappear and new bonds are formed. Read Less
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"Proximity Studies" is the culmination of a series of "proximity" related experiments written in Processing (processing.org) over the past few months.

We were interested to see what forms would emerge, when points, arranged in rigid structures are distorted, corrupted, transformed or displaced.

Points are initially structured in lines, grids, particle fields, concentric circles & spheres.
At each frame of the animation, we check neighbouring points to see if they are "in range", and if so, we draw a line.

As we corrupt those structures, for example by moving rings of points apart, or displacing points on a grid, old bonds disappear and new bonds are formed.

All frames were generated within Processing, and post effects added with Premiere Pro.

Mike Brondbjerg : @mikebrondbjerg
Kultur Design : kultur.design