The Films of Jake Burgess

When I was doing my daily movie posters, I was lucky to have my poster for Dogma re-tweeted by that film's writer/director, Kevin Smith. One person who saw the poster was a Canadian film student named Jake Burgess. He asked me if I wanted to do a poster for a small indie film he was doing, Saturn's Rings. "Sure!"

There was no set photography for any of these films and I saw that as a challenge: how to do more with less. As a result, most of these posters are simply HD screenshots exported directly from Final Cut. Something I've learned from the poster designers I love... if you have just one image and maybe the quality isn't great... GO WITH IT! Blow it up, add grain, distort it, rotate it... make it look interesting!

(In the case of multiple posters, the final poster is aligned to the right. Not all credits are final.)
In the case of The 60% Man, the hand-drawn light bulb and percentage sign were inspired by similar animation done for the film in After Effects.

The teaser poster for, uh... [sheepish grin]... Fuck My Friends was inspired by a poster I heard about on The Poster Boys podcast with Sam Smith and Brandon Schaefer. Google "Lickerish Quartet poster" and you'll see what I mean. I asked Burgess to take a photo of himself giving the finger and I took it from there. I love using a fancy typeface (Lust Script) to contrast with the profane title.

And yes, for the sake of propriety, I did a censored version, too!
Red-Eyed by Khizer Khani

Another young filmmaker who saw my work on social media and wanted to collaborate. Once again, these are all HD screenshots. It certainly helps when the source material already has great camerawork.
The Plague by Guille Carbonell  

Guille Carbonell is a commercial director in Uruguay. He directed a short horror film titled The Plague. This was the first film for which I had hi-res set photography and the genre elements inspired a variety of looks.

(The final poster is on the bottom right.)
From the Top (Desde el principio) by Miguel Soliman 

Miguel Soliman is a film student at the School of Visual Arts in New York City. He saw my work online and wondered if I'd be interested in creating a poster for his thesis short film. The dialogue is in Spanish, hence the title. I followed the formal rules and capitalized only the first word of the title. [clears throat] High school Spanish wasn't my best subject!

(The final poster is on the bottom right.)