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    ‘Sonophore’ is a site-specific interactive sound installation developed in 2011 by Signal to Noise. The project title; ‘Sonophore’ can be transla… Read More
    ‘Sonophore’ is a site-specific interactive sound installation developed in 2011 by Signal to Noise. The project title; ‘Sonophore’ can be translated from Latin as ‘sound-carrier’, with the work intending to explore magnetic tape’s capacity to hold and transmit sonic information. As visitors enter the installation space they are invited to use a custom interface to interact with hundreds of strips of unspooled audio cassette tape. This tape is attached to the walls of the space, and laterally spans its interior. It surrounds the participant and audience, following the space’s physical contours which act as a structure on which the tape can be both displayed and interacted with. Read Less
    Published:
Sonophore
(2011)

‘Sonophore’ is a site-specific interactive sound installation developed in 2011 by Signal to Noise. The project title; ‘Sonophore’ can be translated from Latin as ‘sound-carrier’, with the work intending to explore magnetic tape’s capacity to hold and transmit sonic information. As visitors enter the installation space they are invited to use a custom interface to interact with hundreds of strips of unspooled audio cassette tape. This tape is attached to the walls of the space, and laterally spans its interior. It surrounds the participant and audience, following the space’s physical contours which act as a structure on which the tape can be both displayed and interacted with.
The format of magnetic tape has a physical capacity to capture the ephemeral and transitory nature of sound. As part of this piece, this medium is mapped directly onto the physical structure of a space, connecting the sound content of tape with the building itself. The sound content is site referential and consists of selected material gathered from the local area, including sources such as found recordings and sound archives. These sounds can be gathered or recorded specifically for each exhibition. Unique spaces or structures can prove extremely effective in providing audio content for this work, for example derelict/disused buildings. As the participant interacts with the tape they can recall and ‘play back’ these captured sounds in a playful and sonically interesting experience.
CREDITS:
Oliver Wilshen
Niall Quinn



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