Trademark News
Learning How To Trademark A Phrase

There are many people who are interested in learning how to trademark a phrase. This makes sense seeing as how a special tagline or catchphrase can be worth millions in certain situations, and be a crucial part of your brand in others. However there is a process to follow and not every application will be accepted. You do increase your chances by following these six steps.

#1: First go to the US Patent & Trademark Office online. On their official government website check out the original works section and make sure your praise meets every single one of those requirements. This is an all or nothing proposition. If it does proceed it does not then don't bother going for a trademark.

#2: Next do a search to see if your specific phrase is actually available. You need to make sure it has not already been trademarked by somebody else.

#3: Assuming that your phrase is available (and it can even be a single word in special circumstances) then you will want to take the next step and fill out the initial application form. This is a crucial part to learning how to trademark a phrase. This specific form is available online and can be downloaded directly from the website.

#4: Complete the form in its entirety. This formal inquiry or a variety of information including your name, address, and phone number. Want to take absently sure the trademark is written perfectly word for word. Do not mess this part up!

#5: The next step is to submit the form to the office. The submission can actually happen one of two ways: through mail or through electronic submission.

#6: Finally, if you are serious then make sure you pay the filing fee. This fee can vary based on the year, the method of application, and a variety of other factors but it often costs between $275 and $350 as of this writing.

Follow these six steps and you will be on your way to trademarking the phrase of your choice.
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