Sample Writing: Open Door Policy
" Preconceived notions are locks on the door to wisdom." - Mary Browne

With the rise of mobile and social technologies, the social norms of office etiquette are being redefined and shaped to a more open interaction with employees to upper management. No longer will major decisions be made "behind closed doors" as companies make the move to "Open Door" policies.

If Facebook, Apple, and Zappos stand as the testament to this approach in maintaining an open collaborative environment with employs does have its merits. An Open Door Policy could potentially lead to a better workforce flow, create a more positive work culture and even drive up stock for your company.

If CEOs of transitioning companies were to adopt this policy, it doesn't have to be time-consuming, costly or even intrusive to implement when taking into consideration these five simple steps as advised by Michael Walsh of <a href="http://texasceomagazine.com/departments/modern-day-open-door-policy/">Texas CEO Magazine</a>, who is also the CEO of <a href="https://www.cariloop.com/">Dallas-based Cariloop</a>, a comprehensive services, and tools to help families plan for and manage the care of aging loved ones.

Establish a preferred method of communication.
Consider what form of communication is reliable, easy to learn, and can handle a large group of five or more using it at once. Be it as simple as a mass e-mail list or an app like Slack, be sure to have a way for all your employees to engage with major or minor decisions being made with the company.
One minute meeting.

Take the time to gather up your team to inform them of the day's problem or even success of the week while also taking suggestions from the brief meeting. You can easily do this in a break room or have everyone meet at your desk. Engaging with employees at the start of the day or mid-day with open dialogue for feedback can make employees feel that their voice matters to your company.

Make time for personal time.
This may seem a bit radical but try to encourage your team to rethink the idea of personal time beyond "vacation days". Work has to end before that worker steps foot into a car. This is especially important if your workers are often missing big moments such as a daughter's wedding or the birth of a child due to work demands. Having a productive worker is making sure that their personal life is balance with the demands of work. Letting your workers know that you value their time at work as much as at home can foster a loyal, accountable, and more satisfied employee.
Be creative in celebrating wins.

Whether it's a PA announcement or some lucky volunteer running up and down the halls spraying confetti, everyone in the company should take part in celebrating victories together. You'd be surprised how much of a boost in moral a silly, card to each team member can be.

Get social....events.
We've all seen what a little after-hours shindig can be like for coworkers in arms, but don't be that CEO whose never stepped foot in a game of kickball. Plan at least two events a year for you and your employees to have a bit of fun together in a non-work related environment. Strengthen that bond of kinship through a game of bowling if you must!
See? Open Door Policy can be a wonderful tool in creating a successful work environment. Maybe you'll be the next company to spark the next big thing.
Sample Writing: Open Door Policy
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Sample Writing: Open Door Policy

Sample Writing
1
16
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Published:

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