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    Around the world many people grow up feeling alien in their own homes simply because they are gay or transgender. Many countries have strong homo… Read More
    Around the world many people grow up feeling alien in their own homes simply because they are gay or transgender. Many countries have strong homophobic social structures that often manifest into written law. It is because of the feeling of isolation or the fear of being harmed that people leave their native countries to seek asylum elsewhere. Some of these people have found their way to a safer home in the United States. The asylum process is far from perfect and with the current political atmosphere towards immigration some fear it may only get worse, yet many hope and work towards establishing a life and a place to call home. Because of the danger of being identified as gay either by anyone in their home countries or the negative effect it might have on their application for asylum they remain anonymous to share their stories. Read Less
    Published:
"We came to the USA in August, 2014, a year after president Putin signed Russia’s so –called “gay propaganda” law. We were forced to leave Russa since the law was signed we were attacked several times by things slurring anti-gay abuses, and there were even physical attacks."
"When I left my country, I decided to create my own life. I chose no to let others to shape up my life. It's my experience and my journey... I'm the only one who deserves to be in charge of it."
"Inside my bedroom where I spend much of my time alone thinking about myself because I have nobody to talk to."
"Homesickness, loneliness, I left my friends and family behind. I miss my home but I can’t find them."
"We applied for asylum in December 2014, and as of February 2017, we are still waiting for the interview with USCIS. It’s a very stressful period in our life, even though we now have our employment authorization documents and social security numbers, we are still in a limbo. And with the new administration in the white house no one can say what will happen with LGBT asylum seekers."
"I’m hopeful that my asylum application will be granted, and the rainy days of my journey towards finding a place I can call home will be over. I will finally be able to see the sun."
"I always thought that all of my life I would have to live in the darkness and isolation of living in the closet. I always believed that I had to hide who I really am, and stay in the shadows, so no one could hurt me again."