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    The Eight Views of Omi, a print series of images depicting Japan’s Lake Biwa and its surroundings, became an enormously popular theme amongst Edo… Read More
    The Eight Views of Omi, a print series of images depicting Japan’s Lake Biwa and its surroundings, became an enormously popular theme amongst Edo-period (1615-1868) ukiyo-e artists. Based upon poems by Prince Konoe Masaie (1444-1505) and his son Konoe Naomichi (d. 1544), who was in turn inspired by landscape paintings from the Song (960-1279) and Yuan (1271-1368) dynasties, the eight images display the inherent beauty of seasonal changes and daily events near Lake Biwa: the autumn moon as seen from Ishiyama Temple, the snow lingering on Mount Hira, the sunset viewed from Seta, the sound of Mii Temple’s evening bell, the ships returning to Yabase Harbor, the clearing skies of Awazu, Karasaki’s night rain, and a flock of geese descending upon Katata. Beginning in the early 18th century, these scenarios were faithfully illustrated by artists such as Suzuki Harunobu (1725?-1770) and Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1858). Soon thereafter, Isoda Koryūsai (1735-1790) and his contemporaries began to comment whimsically on the popularity of the series by using it as a thinly veiled conceit to depict fashionable portraits of courtesans and warriors. This exhibition explores faithful and satirical approaches to The Eight Views of Ōmi, revealing the ingenuity with which some artists revitalized the traditional theme even as others reinvented them entirely. "The Eight Views of Omi and Its Parodies" is an exhibition of original Japanese woodblock prints held at the Honolulu Museum of Art from June 16 - August 16, 2012 and curated by Stephen Salel, the Robert F. Lange Research Associate for Japanese Art at the Honolulu Museum of Art. Read Less
    Published:
The Eight Views of Ōmi and its Parodies
June 16 - August 16, 2012
Robert F. Lange Japanese Print Gallery,
Honolulu Museum of Art, Honolulu, HI.
Curated by Stephen Salel,
Robert F. Lange Foundation Research Associate of Japanese Art.
The Eight Views of Ōmi (Ōmi Hakkei), a series of landscapeimages surrounding Lake Biwa in Ōmi Province (ShigaPrefecture), became an enormously popular theme among ukiyo-e print artists during theEdo period (1615-1868).

Theorigin of this theme is said to have been a series of poems written in 1500 byPrince Konoe Masaie (1444-1505) and his son Konoe Naomichi (d. 1544), who werein turn inspired by landscape paintings from the Song (960-1279) and Yuan (1271-1368) dynasties. The eightimages display the inherent beauty of seasonal changes and daily events nearLake Biwa: the autumn moon as seen from Ishiyama Temple, the snow lingering onMount Hira, the sunset viewed from Seta, the sound of Mii Temple’s evening bell,the ships returning to Yabase Harbor, the clearing skies of Awazu, the Karasakinight rain, and a flock of geese descending upon the town of Katata.

Beginningin the early 18 th century, these scenarios were faithfullyillustrated by artists such as Nishimura Shigenaga (1697-1756). Soon thereafter,Isoda Koryūsai (1735-1790) and his contemporaries began to commentwhimsically on the popularity of the series by altering the geographic locationof the scenes or incorporating into the scenes fashionable portraits ofcourtesans or warriors. This exhibition explores both faithful and satiricalapproaches to the Eight Views of Ōmi, revealing the ingenuitywith which some artists revitalized the traditional themes and with whichothers subverted them.

UnidentifiedArtist
Landscape with Buddhist Temples

China, Ming dynasty (1368-1644), early 16 thcentury
Handscroll; ink on silk
Gift of the Wilhelmina Tenney Memorial Fund, 1971
Honolulu Museum of Art
(3852.1)


The pictorial origins of the Eight Views of Ōmican be traced back to the Eight Views ofthe Xiao and Xiang, a painting theme that became popular in China duringthe Song dynasty (960-1279).

According to the DreamPool Essays (1090) by Shen Kuo (1030-1095), the original eightthemes retained all of the same general imagery (e.g., “descending geese”) butsituated them in various locations around the confluence of the Xiao and Xiangrivers in what is now Hunan Province in south-central China. Thoughrecords indicate that the first depictions may have been painted by Song Di (c.1067-c. 1080), the earliest known extant version is a handscroll by WangHong (active c. 1131-1161) now in the collection of Princeton University.

ThisMing-dynasty handscroll closely resembles those depictions of the Xiao andXiang that traveled to Japan during the 14th and 15th centuries and that inspired Prince Konoe Masaie (1444-1505) and his son KonoeNaomichi (d. 1544) to compose a new folio of poems that glorified similarscenery in Ōmi Province, slightly east of their residence in Kyoto. By the 18th century, Nishimura Shigenaga (1697-1756) and his contemporarieshad reinterpreted Prince Konoe’s poetry back into visual images, therebyproducing the first series of landscapes in the history of Japanese woodblockprintmaking.
Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1858)
Autumn Moon at Ishiyama

From the series The Eight Views of Ōmi
Japan, Edoperiod (1615-1868), c. 1834
Woodblock print; ink and color on paper
Gift of James A. Michener, 1991
Honolulu Museum of Art
(23214)

Hiroshige produced at leasttwenty different versions of the EightViews of Ōmi.The group to which this print belongs was issued one year after hisphenomenally popular series, The Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō. One canfind in this print many of the same formal devices seen in the Tōkaidō series, such as an intensesense of serenity and grandeur, the gradation of color in the sky and water,and the backlighting of the mountains.

Unlike the Tōkaidō series, however,Hiroshige’s Ōmi series shows only the slightest hints of civilization. Theenshrouded halls of the Ishiyama Temple nestle against the side of MountIshiyama, the simplest of line-work describes a fishing village along the water’sedge, and, to the right, a silhouette of Lake Biwa Bridge draws the viewer’seye across the water to the distant shore. The waka poem in the cartouche in the upper right corner, attributed toPrince Konoe Masaie (1444-1505) and his son Konoe Naomichi (d. 1544), reads:

The glow of the moon
On the waves of Lake Biwa
Below Mount Ishiyama
Is even more beautiful than
On the shores of the Suma in Akashi.
UtagawaToyohiro (1773-1829)
Autumn Moon: Two Women and Mirror Polisher

From theseries Eight Humorous Views
Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), c. 1800
Woodblock print; ink on paper
Anonymous gift, 2006
Honolulu Museum of Art
(28585)

Depicted here are a pair ofladies checking their hairdos in a hand mirror that the weary craftsman hasjust finished polishing—a tongue-in-cheek reference to theautumn moon over Ishiyama. Though Toyohiro also produced faithful depictions ofthe Eight Views of Ōmi and other landscape prints,like many of his contemporaries, he enjoyed lampooning overly fashionableartistic trends, and his decision to do so with The Eight Views of Ōmisuggests that the pictorial theme was enormously popular at the beginning ofthe 19 th century, long before Hiroshige began to depict the series.


This is an uncolored proofprint that offers insight into the complex process in which a traditionalJapanese woodblock print was produced. The artist would begin by drawing out apreliminary design (shita-e) of the print. He wouldthen continue to refine the sketch and produce a detailed, monochromaticdrawing (hanshita-e).
The block-cutter would paste the hanshita-e face down onto a block ofcherry wood, coat the paper with oil to make it transparent, and carve away thetop layer of the woodblock, leaving untouched only the corners of the block,where registration marks (kentō ) were added, and those areas beneath the lines ofthe artist’s drawing. This initial woodblock, known as the keyblock, was thenused to print several proofs (kyōgō ), which were in turn used like hanshita-eto create a unique block for each color intended in the final image.
UtagawaKunitora (died c. 1854-1856)
Clearing Skies at Awazu

From the series The Eight Views of Ōmi
Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), c. 1834-1835
Woodblock print; ink and color on paper
Gift of Mrs. C. M. Cooke, Sr.
Honolulu Museum of Art
(09794)

Even without the depiction of figures or referencesto historical events, some of the EightViews of Ōmi havenevertheless generated narratives through which their imagery can beinterpreted. The geographical name Awazu is homophonous with the phrase “do notmeet,” suggesting the loneliness of lovers separated by insurmountablecircumstances. Though notinscribed on the print, the poem by Prince Konoe Masaie (1444-1505) and his son KonoeNaomichi (d. 1544) that originally inspired this image conveys a similar senseof loss:
Clouds aredispersed by the same wind
That sends onehundred boats
One thousandboats
Through thebreaking waves
That surroundAwazu.
Isoda Koryūsai (1735-1790)
Clearing Mist over theShikian Restaurant in Nakasu, near Shin Ohashi Bridge

From the series Eight Elegant Views
of Places in the Capitol
Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), c. 1776
Woodblock print; ink andcolor on paper
Gift of James A. Michener,1973
Honolulu Museum of Art
(16419)

Scenes of undisturbed naturesuch as the Eight Views of Ōmi were particularly popularin metropolitan centers such as Edo, whose citizens yearned forreminders of a more tranquil lifestyle. Many artists such as Koryūsai, however, sought anopportunity to reflect in their artwork the daily urban experiences of theiraudience.

Like Banridō Tōko, Koryüsai transferred the Ōmi themes to Nakasu, theartificial island that served as a popular pleasure district during the 18 thcentury. (Tōko’s Evening Glow at Eitai Bridge is also on view in this gallery.)
UtagawaHiroshige (1797-1858)
Returning Sails at Yabase

From the series The Eight Views of Ōmi
Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), c. 1857
Woodblock print; ink and color on paper
Gift of James A. Michener, 1991
Honolulu Museum of Art
(23207)

In many of Hiroshige’s seascapes, ships are shownfar out towards the horizon and described with little more than whitequadrilaterals to denote their sails. In this work, however, he renders themwith the utmost care, and one can even see hints of the sailors gazing out intothe distance and consulting their maps. Such details emphasize the celebratorymood of this image, a perfect complement to the sense of loneliness conveyed inthis scene’s counterpart, Clearing Skiesat Awazu.
The corresponding poem, attributed to Prince KonoeMasaie (1444-1505) and his son Konoe Naomichi (d. 1544), reads:

With filledsails
The boatsreturn home to Yabase
In the gentlebreeze
Back to theshores of Uchide.
Isoda Koryūsai (1735-1790)
Returning Sails of the Crane

From theseries Eight Views of
Famous Birds and Parlors
Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), c. 1776
Woodblock print; ink and color on paper
Gift of James A. Michener, 1991
Honolulu Museum of Art
(21741)

Along with UtagawaToyohiro’s Autumn Moon: Two Women andMirror Polisher, Koryūsai’s Returning Sails of theCrane typified an artistic trend in the late 18 th century knownas “parlor parody” (zashiki mitate),in which banal household objects were substituted as humorously inadequate replacementsfor the majestic landscapes surrounding Lake Biwa.


Like Toyohiro, Koryūsai confines his figures toa rather humble interior space but pushes the absurdity of the image evenfurther through the use of word-play. Rather than leisurely contemplating scenes of“famous places” (meisho), Koryūsai’s characters glance outthe window to catch fleeting glimpses of “famous birds” (meichō ).
NishimuraShigenaga (1697-1756)
Descending Geese at Katata

From the series The Eight Views of Ōmi
Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), early 1730s
Woodblock print; ink and color on paper
Gift of James A. Michener, 1991
Honolulu Museum of Art
(21678)

Considering the dating of the print and the artisticconventions (particularly those of the Tosa School of Yamato-e painting) popular at thetime, the deep pictorial space that Shigenaga achieves in this print is nothingless than extraordinary. An intersecting network of diagonal lines draws theviewer’s eye from the group of villagers chatting in the foreground back to asmall hut along the lakeshore, onward to a roofed fishing pier, and stillfurther back to a flock of geese in silhouette, the shapes of their bodiesalmost seamlessly blending into the poem above them, which is attributed toPrince Konoe Masaie (1444-1505) and his son Konoe Naomichi (d. 1544):

Flyingacross numerous peaks
Andquickly approaching Koshiji
Yet thewild geese cannot resist
Descending at Katada.
UtagawaKuniyoshi (1797-1861)
Descending Geese at Takadono

From the series
Eight Views of Beautiful Shields
Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), c. 1843-1847
Woodblock print; ink and color on paper
Gift of Victor S.K. Houston in honor of his wife, Pinao Brickwood Houston, 1941
Honolulu Museum of Art
(11641.05)

Kuniyoshi’s opulent printdepicts Taira Masakado (d. 940), a samurai whose rebellion against thegovernment during the Heian period (794-1185) was commemorated inseveral Kabuki plays. The repressive Tenpō Reforms of 1842-1847 banned all prints withtheatrical subjects, and in order to circumvent the restriction, Kuniyoshiincorporates into this Kabuki print references to the Eight Views of Ōmi,specifically that of the descending geese.

Though befitting a warrior print such as this homageto Masakado, the “beautiful shields” mentioned in the print’s title is in facta pun on the word mitate, which alsomeans parody. As Isoda Koryūsai does in Returning Sails ofthe Crane, Kuniyoshi not only lampoons the traditional imagery of the Eight Views of Ōmi but also acknowledges thecountless parodies that the series of landscape prints inspired.

SuzukiHarunobu (1725?-1770)
Night Rain at Karasaki

From the series The Eight Views of Ōmi
Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), c. 1760s-1770s
Woodblock print; ink and color on paper
Gift of James A. Michener, 1959
Honolulu Museum of Art
(14649)

Hie Shrine in Karasaki is dedicated to protectingone of the oldest and most spectacular pine trees in Japan. In the Geographical Records of the Ōmi Area (Ōmi yochi shiryaku, 1734), its network ofbranches, said at that time to cover a 150 square-meter area, are described as “a perfectrain shelter,” and certainly such a reputation was furthered by depictions suchas this in the Eight Views of Ōmi and its corresponding poem,attributed to Prince Konoe Masaie (1444-1505) and his son KonoeNaomichi (d. 1544):

In the nightrain its green fades
Still in theevening breeze
Stands thefamous pine tree
Of Karasaki.

Primarilyknown for his lighthearted portraits of lithe women, Harunobu was a master ofthe sort of parlor parody (zashiki mitate)found in Isoda Koryūsai‘s Returning Sails of theCrane. Prints by Harunobu such as this, in which the artist offers a sober,faithful depiction of a literary theme, are exceedingly rare.
Isoda Koryūsai (1735-1790)
Night Rain at Nakamachi

From theseries
Eight Elegant Views of Fukugawa
Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), c. 1778
Woodblock print; ink and color on paper
Gift of James A. Michener, 1970
Honolulu Museum of Art
(15998)

In his modernized parody, Koryūsai replaces the awe-inspiring pine of Karasakiwith an ordinary paper umbrella shared by two geisha and their attendant, whocarries a shamisen, as they stroll down Nakamachi Street in Fukugawa, anunlicensed entertainment district located in southeast Edo. The poem at the topof the print reads:

The rain thatcollects
At the edge of a shared umbrella
Soaks oursleeves.
Tears of joyfall at night
As we rememberthe past.
UtagawaHiroshige II (1826-1869)
Evening Snow at Mount Hira

From theseries The Eight Views of Ōmi
Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), c. 1859
Woodblock print; ink and color on paper
Gift of James A. Michener, 1957
Honolulu Museum of Art
(28569)

In his approach to the Eight Views of Ōmi,Hiroshige II (also known as Utagawa Shigenobu) was deeply indebted to the workof his teacher, Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1858). Here Hiroshige IIdepicts the slope of Mount Hira rising up and partly obscuring a distant viewof Lake Biwa, almost a mirror image of Hiroshige’s “Autumn Moon at Ishiyama.”The poem above the landscape, attributed to Prince Konoe Masaie (1444-1505) and his son KonoeNaomichi (d. 1544), reads:

When it clearsafter snowfall
The tops ofMount Hira
At dusk surelysurpass
The beauty of cherry trees in bloom.
UtagawaHiroshige (1797-1858)
Evening Snow at Asakusa

From the series
Eight Famous Views of Edo
Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), c. 1843-1847
Woodblock print; ink and color on paper
Gift of James A. Michener, 1991
Honolulu Museum of Art
(22351)

By the end of his career, even Hiroshige, the artistmost responsible for popularizing the EightViews of Ōmiduring his lifetime (and for insuring the series’ art-historical significancethereafter) had begun to abandon traditional landscape motifs and replace themwith the whimsical figures that viewers had long ago come to expect in anydepictions of Ōmi.
UtagawaHiroshige (1797-1858)
Evening Bell at Mii Temple

From the series TheEight Views of Ōmi
Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), c. 1857
Woodblock print; ink and color on paper
Gift of James A. Michener, 1991
Honolulu Museum of Art
(23206)

In clouds that crown a view of Lake Biwa’s westernshore, Hiroshige quotes an eerie poem by Prince Konoe Masaie (1444-1505) and his son KonoeNaomichi (d. 1544), which perhaps alludes to the brutal violence that engulfedMii Temple during the Genpei War (1180-1185).

I think that dawn has made a vow
To wait first outside
Until it has heard
The evening bell of Mii Temple.

Hiroshige’s depiction of thelandscape enshrouded in mist further acknowledges another literary reference:the witty response offered by Matsuo Bashō (1644-1694) when the poet waschallenged to describe all Eight Views ofŌmi ina single seventeen-syllable haiku:

Sevenviews were lost
In mistwhen I heard
Thetemple bell.
UtagawaKuniyoshi (1797-1861)
Evening Bell at Ueno

From the series
Eight Views of Wise Women
Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), c. 1844-1848
Woodblock print; ink and color on paper
Gift of James A. Michener, 1987
Honolulu Museum of Art
(20006)

The inscription on the upper half of the printreads:

A twenty-eight-year-old woman bythe name of Aki (Autumn) who worked at a confectionary in the Eastern Capitolwent to a cherry-blossom-viewing party in Ueno Park one day. Near the Kannon Hall of KiyomizuTemple, she noticed a well surrounded by Daihannya cherry trees.

“This area is much too dangerous for people who have been drinking to enjoycherry blossoms,” she declared. Henceforth, these trees were known as theAutumnal Cherry Trees. Aki became a disciple of [the poet] Kikaku, and later,as a poetry critic, she adopted the pen-name of Kikukōtei.

The image presumably depicts Aki, who has juststrung from a branch of the cherry tree a tanzakupoem:


Thecherry blossoms near the well
Aredangerous
To thosewho’ve had too much wine

In this farcical way,Kuniyoshi incorporates all of the elements traditionally found in either a traditionalEight Views of Ōmi print or one of its laterparodies: beautiful natural scenery with precise seasonal references, a shortpoem floating inexplicably in mid-air, anda sumptuously dressed woman.
Nishimura Shigenaga (1697-1756)
Evening Glowat Seta

From the series The Eight Views of Ōmi
Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), late 1720s or early1730s
Woodblock print; ink and color on paper
Gift of James A. Michener, 1959
Honolulu Museum of Art
(14262)

One of the earliest Japanese print artists to depictthe Ōmiscenes, Shigenaga draws inspiration from the yamato-epaintings of the Tosa School, such as the illustrated Tale of Genji Handscroll (12 th century), in whichcharacters are depicted from a bird’s-eye view, scenes are framedby billowing clouds and sinuous trails of mist, and the pictorial space isdivided by strong diagonals. Shigenaga hand-colored this print, and the bright huescomplement the lively gestures and charming facial expressions of hischaracters—several pilgrims preparing to cross a bridge overthe Uji River, which originates at Lake Biwa, while a nearby fisherman hauls inhis nets.

The wakapoem in the upper half of the print, attributed to Prince Konoe Masaie (1444-1505) and his son KonoeNaomichi (d. 1544), reads:

The longbridge at Seta
Over whichcrosses the setting sun
Passing farbeyond the mountains
Dripping with autumn dew.
Banridō Tōko (active early 18th century)
Evening Glow at Eitai Bridge

From the series
The Eight Views of Nakasu
Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), c. 1716-1736
Woodblock print; ink andcolor on paper
Gift of James A. Michener,1991
Honolulu Museum of Art
(25067)

Some of the early parodies of the Eight Views of Ōmi were far more subtle thansuch blatant lampoons as Utagawa Toyohiro’s AutumnMoon: Two Women and Mirror Polisher. Nakasu was an artificially constructedisland in the middle of the Sumida River in Edo. During the 18 thcentury, Nakasu was known as a vibrant entertainment district, and the EitaiBridge that linked Nakasu to the mainland was often crowded with revelers andcourtesans.
UtagawaSadahide (1807-1873)
The Eight Views of Ōmi

Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), c. 1825
Woodblock print; ink and color on paper
Gift of James A. Michener, 1987
Honolulu Museum of Art
(20007)

In this large-scale triptych, Sadahideweaves together all eight of the Ōmi scenes, each designatedwith a red, vertical colophon, into a single panoramic, multi-seasonal landscape.Beginning in the lower right corner, a group of women enjoy the sunset from anarched bridge in Seta. Across the bridge, Mount Ishiyama rises majesticallybefore a moonlit sky. To the right of Mount Ishiyama, the plains of Awazuappear through a layer of dissipating mist, and, behind Awazu, Mii Templesounds its evening bell. To the right of Mii Temple, an enormous tree,supported here and there with wooden columns, covers the entire tip of CapeKarasaki.

Slightly further to theright, a flock of geese descend upon the town of Katata, and behind Katatalooms snow-covered Mount Hie. Fromthere, a line of sailboats lead the viewer’s gaze to a point halfway down theright edge of the print, where a number of sailboats are preparing to dock atYabase harbor. The remainder of the print is filled with whimsical details suchas beautifully dressed geisha fishingin rowboats.
The following is a complete series of The Eight Views of Omi by Utagawa Hiroshige.
Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1858)
Sunsetat Seta

From the series The Eight Views of Ōmi
Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), c. 1834-1835
Woodblock print; ink andcolor on paper
Gift of James A. Michener,1991
Honolulu Museum of Art
(23227)

Inscription:

The long bridge at Seta
Over which crosses thesetting sun
Passing far beyond themountains
Dripping withautumn dew.
Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1858)
Evening Snow on Mount Hira

From the series The Eight Views of Ōmi
Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), c. 1834-1835
Woodblock print; ink andcolor on paper
Gift of James A. Michener,1991
Honolulu Museum of Art
(23228)

Inscription:

When it clears aftersnowfall
The tops of Mount Hira
At dusk surely surpass
The beauty of cherry treesin bloom.
Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1858)
Descending Geese at Katata

From the series The Eight Views of Ōmi
Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), c. 1834-1835
Woodblock print; ink andcolor on paper
Gift of James A. Michener,1991
Honolulu Museum of Art
(23229)

Inscription:

Flying across numerous peaks
And quickly approachingKoshiji
Yet the wild geese cannotresist
Descending at Katada.
Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1858)
Clearing Skies at Awazu

From the series The Eight Views of Ōmi
Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), c. 1834-1835
Woodblock print; ink andcolor on paper
Gift of James A. Michener,1991
Honolulu Museum of Art
(23233)

Inscription:

Cloudsare dispersed by the same wind
Thatsends one hundred boats
Onethousand boats
Throughthe breaking waves
Thatsurround Awazu.
Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1858)
Returning Sails at Yabase

From the series The Eight Views of Ōmi
Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), c. 1834-1835
Woodblock print; ink andcolor on paper
Gift of James A. Michener,1991
Honolulu Museum of Art
(23230)

Inscription:

With filled sails
The boats return home toYabase
In the gentle breeze
Back to the shores ofUchide.
UtagawaHiroshige (1797-1858)
Autumn Moon at Ishiyama Temple

From the series The Eight Views of Ōmi
Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), c. 1834-1835
Woodblock print; ink and color on paper
Gift of James A. Michener, 1991
Honolulu Museum of Art
(23231)

Inscription:

The glow ofthe moon
On the wavesof Lake Biwa
Below MountIshiyama
Is even morebeautiful than
On the shores of the Suma in Akashi.
Utagawa Hiroshige (1797-1858)
Night Rain at Karasaki

From the series The Eight Views of Ömi
Japan, Edo period (1615-1868), c. 1834-1835
Woodblock print; ink andcolor on paper
Gift of James A. Michener,1991
Honolulu Museum of Art
(23232)

Inscription:

In the night rain its greenfades
Still in the evening breeze
Stands the famous pine tree
Of Karasaki.

UtagawaHiroshige (1797-1858)
Evening Bell at Mii Temple

From the series The Eight Views of Ōmi
Japan,Edo period (1615-1868), c. 1834-1835
Woodblockprint; ink and color on paper
Giftof James A. Michener, 1991
Honolulu Museum of Art
(23234)

Inscription:

I think that dawn has made a vow
To wait first outside
Until it has heard
The evening bell of MiiTemple.