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    This project began one casual hiking morning just down from the Scottish Woods Trail entrance of the Austin greenbelt. I lifted my camera to shoo… Read More
    This project began one casual hiking morning just down from the Scottish Woods Trail entrance of the Austin greenbelt. I lifted my camera to shoot the gorgeous waterfall scenery. At the bottom of my shot was a water bottle and a crushed red canister of Pringles chips that someone had left. I raised my camera, annoyed that this trash was in the view. I had a choice in this moment, I could walk away silently upset as I had always done or take action to do something about it. I shifted my camera downward and started playing with photos of the scenery with the trash as main focus artifacts in the foreground. Photographing trash left behind and carrying out what I can became the theme of my greenbelt hikes since then. After a few hikes documenting trash, I reached out to see if these photos could be of benefit to organizations already working on this issue. The rangers at the Austin Parks and Recreation dept were thrilled with the idea, as it matches their mission and goals in a way that they havent yet been able to share. Ive also been in talks with the Keep Austin Beautiful organization. The title “Lost and Found” carries the intention to inspire awareness to the issue of trash on the greenbelt in an accessible, friendly way. People who are attracted to the greenbelt go there to enjoy being in nature and play in the waters of the river. Some may not actually know to take their trash out. This seems foreign to me, but as I look at the faces that pass me on my way out in the morning, I see excitement and anticipation of a great day in nature. I see good intentions in everyone who goes, and yet trash is still left behind. When I taught adventure travel for teenagers and we shared Leave No Trace principles with them (pack out what you pack in), they never really thought about where their trash went. One girl said “doesn’t nature just… eat it?” Although a funny statement, its also a profound insight into many people’s mentality. “Lost and Found” implies that what is left has to be handled by someone. This could be a ranger but more often its another member of the nature loving community, like me. Read Less
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An intersection of natural and humanal.

The title “Lost and Found” carries the intention to inspire awareness to the issue of trash on the greenbelt in an accessible, friendly way.