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    My major project about the significance of copying on the MA Graphic Media Design course, London College of Communication, UAL 2015/16. Photogra… Read More
    My major project about the significance of copying on the MA Graphic Media Design course, London College of Communication, UAL 2015/16. Photography (project presentation): Nikola Zelmanovic (www.nikolazelmanovic.com) Read Less
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This research focuses on the contemporary phenomenon of copying within the field of visual culture. Working with the notion that the copying process doesn’t necessarily have to be perceived as a tool for de-generation of the context and the image itself, I attempt to explore the act of copying as a contemporary phenomenon through which multiple identities emerge or get ascribed by the transformation of the original artefact’s context. Throughout history the copy was mostly followed by doubtful “reputation”, thus I intend to question whether that perception has or could be changed within the contemporary society. 

My intention is to explore and try to create a visual experience which allows the space for contemplation. The goal is primarily evoking meaning rather than boldly presenting the “truth”. So instead of trying to prove something, I intend to observe and think about solutions with an objective to find out wether there are alternative interpretations to the mentioned ideas, and what the boundaries of these interpretations are.

The main motif of this research is a single image, an old postcard which has become a part of the public domain, loosing its status of copyright. By the processes of deconstruction, postproduction, and reinterpretation I turned the postcard into a contemporary print and put it into public circulation. The print is given out with instructions for the receivers to reinterpret it in any way they find suitable, whereupon I assume the role of a mere coordinator instead of author by gathering the documentation of the re-contextualisation processes, and finally present the generated content in the form of a documentary artist-book. 

This is conceived as a “never-ending” project, and the engagement of the audience is the only way for the project to continue evolving. It is an ongoing investigative research, and I believe this work must be taken away from me to fulfil its purpose. After my first intervention of “erasing” the primary context of the postcard, my authorship stops and I become a collector and organiser of information and evidence.