Aesop's Fables
A selection of illustrated fables
The Lion and the Mouse


Some field-mice were playing in the woods where a lion was sleeping, when one of the mice accidentally ran over the lion. The lion woke up and immediately grabbed the wretched little mouse with his paw. The mouse begged for mercy, since he had not meant to do the lion any harm. The lion decided that to kill such a tiny creature would be a cause for reproach rather than glory, so he forgave the mouse and let him go. A few days later the lion fell into a pit and was trapped. He started to roar, and when the mouse heard him, he came running. Recognizing the lion in the trap, the mouse said to him, ‘I have not forgotten the kindness that you showed me”’ The mouse then began to gnaw at the cords binding the lion, cutting through the strands and undoing the clever ingenuity of the hunter’s art. The mouse was thus able to restore the lion to the woods, setting him free form his captivity.
The Fisherman and the Fish


A fisherman was pulling in the net which he had just cast and, as luck would have it, the net was filled with all kinds of sea creatures. The little fish escaped to the bottom of the net and slipped out through it’s many holes, but the big fish was caught and lay stretched out flat aboard the boat.
The Mosquito and the Ox


A mosquito once asked an ox, ‘Given that you are so axceedingly large and strong, why do you suffer this enslavement to people day after day? Look at me: I lacerate their flesh without pity, drinking great gulps pf their blood!’ The ox said, ‘I cannot help but be greatful to the human race, since I am cherished and loved by them to an extraordinary degree, and they often rub my forehead and shoulders.’ The mosquito admitted, ‘Woe is me! This rubbing of which you are so fond is the worst thing that can happen to me: when they do that, I die.’
The Stag and His Reflection

A stag had grown thrirsty and went to a spring in order to drink some water. When he saw the reflection of his body in the water, he disparaged the slenderness of his legs but revelled in the shape and size of his horns. All of a sudden, some hunters appeared and began to chase him. As the stag ran along the level ground of the plain, he outdistanced his pursuers and beat them to the marsh by the river. Without thinking about what he was doing, the stag kept on going, but his horns became tangles in overhanging branches and he was captured by the hunters. The stag groaned and said, ‘ Woe is me, wretched creature that i am! The thing that i disparaged could have saved me, while I have been destroyed by the very thing I boasted about.
Aesop's Fables
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Aesop's Fables

Images from a self-promotional Illustrated book.
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