Family Day—The Evolution Of A Logo
This is the story about a logo evolution. I was hired to design a signet for this German venture capital event—the Family Day—back in 2008. And since then I redesigned it every year. First, not the logo itself but the accompanying key visual changed for each event. Later, I overhauled the logo itself.
The Begining

It all started with this simple idea of a dandelion. A symbol of elements gathering at a core, of a unit that is more than the sum of it's parts. And a welcoming flower. 
That was the first year's design and it was ment to last—what a fool I was.
The Early Years

As all things fade, so did the designs of the years 2008 to 2009. My hard drive crashed and took with it the first years' works. But the key visuals for the years 2010 to 2012 show the pattern I used to follow:
1. A slightly changing title with the year and the exact date of the event
2. The dandelion logo somewhere on the layout
3. A changing image effect for each year, framed by a honeycomb pattern
Into the wild

After 2012 the client became kind of bored with the designs of the early years. He didn't feel the reserved graphics fit the progress the event was taking. Instead he wanted the event to evaporate a more unique and powerful flair. 
// 2013 //
Of the three drafts for 2013 the most grungy made it into production. Looking back today, the other two seem like some kind of middle ground between the early years and the design that was finally chosen.
And it became obvious that the dandelion would have no place within a design like that.
Final version of 2013
Draft of 2013
Draft of 2013
// 2014 //
In 2014 the leading idea was to establish a strong color theme, just like the bright cyan of 2013. So we—that's me and my contact on the client side—started with a bright yellow (as can be seen in the drafts).
The rounded tiles made it but the strong colours were dropped. Instead we decided to use the corporate red together with 2013's blue.
Final version of 2014
Draft of 2014
Draft of 2014
Draft of 2014
// 2015 //
In that year I had one pretty strong design right from the start. I did throw two more into the race but it was quite obvious that the first was going to make it. Again, an engraving two-colors-theme was in demand. 
Final version of 2015
The Present

After fooling around with the logo and the colours since 2013 the client came to realise that it is much fun but little efficiency to reinvent the wheel each and every year. And it was an expensive luxury, too. No blow-ups, signs, banners or tags could be reused.

So the order was given to make a logo not only for 2016 but for all the years to come. Sounds familiar, right? Back to the beginning of 2008.
Funny enough, the final version of 2016 resembles the dandelion of 2008 at least a bit. But that seems to be the best solution for a logo that is ment to endure. It must not be to fashionable and must go together with the corporate design.

I'm just sketching the—so far final—version of the FD-logo here. If you want to see more of the development stages head over to the Behance post for FD16.
The Future

As I am working on the 2017 stuff already, it seems we stick to 2016's plans and simply swap the year to 17. I guess I will be a good boy and not try to push the client into making expensive changes each year, again. But I am going to be careful to not let boredom and lack of passion sneak into the design in the years to come.
Family Day—The Evolution Of A Logo
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Family Day—The Evolution Of A Logo

How the logo of a major venture capital event in Germany evolved since 2008.
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