Ganbatte (from the japanese 頑張って, meaning "break a leg", "do your best" and sometimes "good luck") is a talent/skill development and job finding company located in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. They offer online courses, workshops and recruiting services for young adult brazilians with low-income that have fewer professional opportunities in society. I worked with graphic designer Júlia Mori on this project and our job was to update and consolidate their visual identity in order to keep a strong and consistent brand and communication.
The Attributes
Ganbatte is a warm, confident and young brand. A teacher and a coach, but most of all a friend. Ganbatte is honest and just. It gives opportunities for those who need and helps them reach their goals, granting them a feeling of success and recognition.
The Logotype
On our first meeting with the client we felt that the logotype, which consists of an origami of a bird - meant to symbolize freedom, the ability to fly high and the idea of chasing your goals - was not aligned with the brand concept in terms of color and form. In our opinion the gradient used in the shadows could not be considered modern within its public and, most importantly, the angle of the bird's flight was inconsistent with the attributes it was meant to transmit.

We completely changed the color palette and style of the logo to a more flat design style to better translate the brand concepts and attributes. We also changed the angle of the bird's flight - this was considered a critical point to the client - and made the text neutral so that the focus could always be the unity of the symbol and its colors:
The Colors
When updating the logotype's visual language we reviewed the brand colors and standardized each one using the PANTONE Matching System. That was meant to be a solution and, ironically, caused us a technical problem: the logotype would have a total of 13 spot colors (7 "solids" + 6 "shadows"). Print designs using PMS colors would come out extremely expensive for the client in comparison to CMYK. As a result, we decided to avoid the use of the PMS-based logo and use pure CMYK for print applications, despite having them specified on the brand's visual identity book.

Based on a study of the brand attributes we also defined Ganbatte as a more colorful brand that could - and should - use its colorfulness at its side to communicate its attributes.

We also considered important that we chose one of the seven colors as the primary brand color to create a stronger visual association in the consumer's mind. Using the brand attributes as a starting point, the color chosen was the slightly unsaturated red in evidence below:
Tints of the brand colors were further developed to help with specific
application scenarios:
The Typography
The client requested that the typography used in the logo remained the same, but we had the freedom to suggest a secondary font family for use in brand materials.
The Applications
We developed a horizontal version of the logotype as well as color and stroke variations for different application scenarios.

The need to develop tints for the brand colors is evident on the very last example, where the logotype is applied on a solid brand color. Using the color at 100% would cause parts of the logo to disappear.
Ganbatte
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Ganbatte

Ganbatte (from the japanese 頑張って, meaning "break a leg", "do your best" and sometimes "good luck") is a talent/skill development and job finding Read More
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