The Little Book of Insecurities (and other problems)
375
28
1
Published:
  • Add to Collection
  • About

    About

    An A5 zine that is the final of my pre-masters semester, a result of a collective, participatory project that asks and invites a dozen of young w… Read More
    An A5 zine that is the final of my pre-masters semester, a result of a collective, participatory project that asks and invites a dozen of young women to try and visualize one (or many) insecurities. The process starts with a couple of questions that try to keep a lovely but open often, flowing conversation between me and the participants about both of our own interpretations of insecurities. Read Less
    Published:
"The Little Book of Insecurities" is a collective and participatory project, in which I asked a dozen of young women, and myself, this main question:

"How would you visualize your insecurities?"

This question was asked to each one separately, which was always followed by a lovely conversation about each participants' own interpretations and visualizations. Some drew, others wrote. 
My role was to find many different and similar ways, in which women are made to feel insecure about themselves. Insecurities come and exist in many different forms and dimensions inside us; whether physical, emotional or even 'unidentifiable' feelings. Inspiration for this project came from the disappointments of sometimes feeling that I can't possibly relate to someone else in regards to my own problems; but insecurities are inevitable. 
They grow with us. They are universal.

This collective zine concept merely exists as a small therapeutic practice that tries to diminish the various big and small voices in one's head. While it might take more than pen and paper to try and work through one's issues and problems, putting it on paper might be the first good step.


________

"I am the tall dark stranger those warnings prepared you for" quote from Bone by Yrsa Daley-Ward, done by Nada.
She'd say: "When I was younger, I would always hide my face with my bangs" I ask: "what changed?" "I started using make up to hide it, but as I'm getting older the make up is starting to ruin my face."
"I didn't grow up with parents that showed affection. When you grow up with that, you have that in you. It's a skill you need to learn, to show love or affection"
Participants - Process
Exhibition
Mini workshop at final exhibition 
Exhibition