Inspired by Denmark
Serie of illustrations done in my daily life in Denmark.
Small things that become big moments on the paper.
Yesterday I came across a fox in the middle of Aarhus. This illustration shows our real encounter.
Today, the case of my danish friend who has the shower in her garden, underneath a pear tree.
There's a place in Denmark where the Baltic Sea and the North Sea meet each other. It looks more or less like this. A true love story.
Hans Christian Andersen was about 1,85 meters tall, 25 cm above the danish national average.
Smells like autumn in the forest next to Aarhus
Mandø is the smallest inhabited island in the Danish Wadden Sea. Is only accessible at low tide through a path of about 4 kilometers in lenght that connects Mandø to the mainland. If you want to visit this little piece of heaven, you have only two opportunities a day. 
Not many people play the hurdy gurdy in Denmark, an instrument that has its roots in the Medieval Period and produces sound when a wheel rubs against the strings. I met Thomas in a folk music festival in Himmelbjerg and he explained that his hurdy gurdy was created especially for him in Catalonia, where i come from!
So I had my first winter bathing in the Baltic Sea. It was nice but also freezing. Things got much better after a sauna session with views to the city.
What if I was born in Denmark in the 14th century? Maybe I would have lived in Ribe and be a Night Watchman. It wasn’t a bad job, I would just have to walk around the streets every night and hold the morning star, a very effective weapon against muggers. Unfortunately I would be too scared of every little noise behind me...
There's an old danish saying: during the months with "R" in it (from September to April), it is possible to eat raw oysters from the sea. So we did it! However, during the summer, the temperature can be high and the toxic algae might accumulate in the oysters- The bird in the foreground is an Oystercatcher.
When spring arrives in Denmark the grey tones of the landscape retreat and give way to the explosion of greens that cover the forest. It is an extraordinary show. This illustrations is from a trip to Himmelbjerget, one of the highest points in Denmark (147 meters high).
Have you ever noticed two porcelain dogs in the windows of a Danish seamen’s home? Since the 19th century the dogs would supposedly be a sign of the sailor's wife secret lover. When the dogs looked out of the window, it was a signal to the lover that there was a free way. The dogs looked inward when the man was home.
You can see some more work on INSTAGRAM 
You can purchase your favorite illustration in my ONLINE SHOP
Inspired by Denmark
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Inspired by Denmark

Personal sketchbook
182
945
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Published:

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