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    The intervention was carried out in August 2014 in St. Petersburg, when the artist bought a few plain white T-shirts from the Swedish clothing ch… Read More
    The intervention was carried out in August 2014 in St. Petersburg, when the artist bought a few plain white T-shirts from the Swedish clothing chain 'H & M'. Without removing any tags from the T-shirts, the artist used professional screen printing techniques to print the T-shirts with texts such as: 'Please Ignore This Text - Keep on Shopping' etc., as if they had been originally designed as such. The next day he went back to the store in order to return and be refunded for his newly modified T-shirt, telling the store’s cashier that it just didn’t fit him. The store’s staff member did not suspect anything, they took back the T-shirt and refunded the artist with his money. The next day the artist returned to the store to find that, his subsequently self-modified T-shirt, was now on sale again complete with its magnetic anti-theft tag which had been reattached. The T-shirt’s new guise had even prompted the store to dis­play it in an even more promi­nent space on the clothes rack. A se­ries of sim­i­lar events has since been con­ducted in­volv­ing print­ing dif­fer­ent texts onto T-shirts as a com­ment on con­tem­po­rary con­sumer cul­ture and the ab­sur­dity of slo­gans that mod­ern ob­jects of con­sumerism of­ten come with. Read Less
    Published:
Artist : Egor Kraft / Cam­era & Screen­print­ing: Ideabros / Sound: A. Let­cius
 
 
The intervention was carried out in August 2014 in St. Petersburg, when the artist bought a few plain white T-shirts from the Swedish clothing chain 'H & M'. Without removing any tags from the T-shirts, the artist used professional screen printing techniques to print the T-shirts with texts such as: 'Please Ignore This Text - Keep on Shopping' etc., as if they had been originally designed as such. The next day he went back to the store in order to return and be refunded for his newly modified T-shirt, telling the store’s cashier that it just didn’t fit him. The store’s staff member did not suspect anything, they took back the T-shirt and refunded the artist with his money.
The next day the artist returned to the store to find that, his subsequently self-modified T-shirt, was now on sale again complete with its magnetic anti-theft tag which had been reattached. The T-shirt’s new guise had even prompted the store to dis­play it in an even more promi­nent space on the clothes rack. 
A se­ries of sim­i­lar events has since been con­ducted in­volv­ing  print­ing dif­fer­ent texts onto T-shirts as a com­ment on con­tem­po­rary con­sumer cul­ture and the ab­sur­dity of slo­gans that mod­ern ob­jects of con­sumerism of­ten come with.
Stills
Wanderings 2.0, Solo Show / Rundum, Tallinn
The pro­ject is a log­i­cal con­tin­u­a­tion of the artists’ wide­spread se­ries of in­ter­ven­tions in­volv­ing text in pub­lic space called www.tosay.it and is dis­played on this web­site by the same name.