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Located in New York City along the Hudson River at 69th Street, the New York Central Railroad Transfer Bridge was used as a docking and loading s… Read More
Located in New York City along the Hudson River at 69th Street, the New York Central Railroad Transfer Bridge was used as a docking and loading station for Car Floats - boats designed to ferry rail cars to and from the train yards in Weehawken, New Jersey. The Transfer Bridge was left to decay until only recently, when what remains of the structure was given Historical Landmark Status by the National Register of Historic Places in 2003. The photographs in this series were shot with film and printed in the darkroom as traditional silver gelatin prints on fiber paper. The prints were then photographed with film on a copy stand and printed yet again. This process of continuous film-to-print reproduction was repeated many times over before the final print was then scanned and printed from the resulting digital file. Like the subject of the photographs, the images themselves are degraded to such a degree that they may appear antiquated, as if taken long ago, though they are quite contemporary in design and construction. Using urban decay and a photographic process that mimics the way in which such detritus is created, the series attempts to question and call attention to our perceptions of what is old, what is new, what was then, and what is now. Read Less
Published:
Then & Now
Fine Art Photo Series
Located in New York City along the Hudson River at 69 th Street, the New York Central Railroad Transfer Bridge was used as a docking and loading station for Car Floats - boats designed to ferry rail cars to and from the train yards in Weehawken, New Jersey. The Transfer Bridge was left to decay until only recently, when what remains of the structure was given Historical Landmark Status by the National Register of Historic Places in 2003.

The photographs in this series were shot with film and printed in the darkroom as traditional silver gelatin prints on fiber paper. The prints were then photographed with film on a copy stand and printed yet again. This process of continuous film-to-print reproduction was repeated many times over before the final print was then scanned and printed yet again from the resulting digital file.

Like the subject of the photographs, the images themselves are degraded to such a degree that they may appear antiquated, as if taken long ago, though they are quite contemporary in design and construction. Using urban decay and a photographic process that mimics the way in which such detritus is created, the series attempts to question and call attention to our perceptions of what is old, what is new, what was then, and what is now.