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    Chroma Scapes came through at the end of the Chroma Dialogues project, at that time I felt something was missing to compliment this colour intera… Read More
    Chroma Scapes came through at the end of the Chroma Dialogues project, at that time I felt something was missing to compliment this colour interaction initiative. In recent years I have been working in the studio to explore painting and drawing interaction but I have also dedicated plenty of time to learning computer based arts such as 3D. The only way I could achieve what I know now in 3D was training myself online. What really triggered the topography idea was a tutorial I watched at the GSG website. That tutorial was made by Chris Schmidt, one of its founders, which immediately led me to Lee Griggs, an artist based in Spain who is working with 3D and the Arnold render engine. When I saw those two references they became an influence right away for this project. I started to practice with this technique to generate 3D geometry out of greyscale colour data using the water colours I had done previously in Chroma Dialogues and the results were pretty good. They were in-line with what I was looking for. To generate topographic relief, I turned the colour textures into greyscale values, this way you define a hight range where the highlights are the highest and the blacks are the lowest points. I aways liked Geography and I felt connected to the nature of this science, in that way it fitted perfectly to my project. I remember working in the studio, choosing the right grain texture and thickness of the paper, then seeing the colours flowing on the paper surface, spreading along the fibre, contaminating the clean space; I couldn’t help imagining these elements becoming rivers, rocks, sand and all this texture gamma you have when you look at air photographs of landscapes. The idea of the 2D-3D transition opened a gap for me to explore and generate my own world of landforms. I guess this gap represents how I can perceive the space in different dimensions, like two versions of a space-form, one driven by the other one to obtain what I called a “chromatic form”, in other words how colour takes shape. I appreciate the knowledge Chris Schmidt and Lee Grigs shared with their work, and I really thank them for this added value to my project. You can check their work on Behance and the Greyscalegorilla website! Enjoy! Read Less
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Chroma Landscapes came through at the end of the Chroma Dialogues project, at that time I felt something was missing to compliment this colour interaction initiative. In recent years I have been working in the studio to explore painting and drawing interaction but I have also dedicated plenty of time to learn computer based arts such as 3D.

What really triggered the topography idea was a tutorial I watched at the GSG website called “Fast 3D Topographies in C4D” made by Chris Schmidt, which immediately led me to Lee Griggs, an artist based in Spain who is been working with 3D and the Arnold (Solid Angle) render engine. 

When I saw those two references they became an influence right away for this project. I started to practice with this technique to generate 3D geometry out of greyscale data using the water colours I had done previously in Chroma Dialogues and the results were pretty good. They were in-line with what I was looking for. 

To generate topographic relief, I turned the colour textures into greyscale values, this way I can define a hight range where the highlights are the highest points and the blacks are the lowest points.

I aways liked Geography and I felt connected to the nature of this science, in that way it fitted perfectly to my project. I remember working in the studio, choosing the right grain texture and thickness of the paper, then seeing the colours flowing on the paper surface, spreading along the fibre, contaminating the clean space; I couldn’t help imagining these elements becoming rivers, rocks, sand and all this texture gamma you have when you look at air photographs of landscapes. The idea of the 2D-3D transition opened a gap for me to explore and generate my own world of landforms. I guess this gap represents how I can perceive the space in different dimensions, like two versions of a space-form, one driven by the other to obtain what I called a “chromatic form”, in other words how colour takes shape.
I appreciate the knowledge Chris Schmidt and Lee Grigs have shared with their work, and I really thank them for this added value to my project. 
You can check their work on Behance and the Greyscalegorilla website! 

I later on found out doing a Arnold Render training how to achieve better results using the Instance mode in the Hair generator tab together with he Correction Deformer, which seems to be a forgotten deformer along the deformers group in C4D, and it basically allows you to edit the topology of a given parametric object in a non destructive way without the need to make the object editable, in other words, you will be able to access the polygons of the parametric object, just make sure to put inside of a Connect Object the parametric obj. then group it inside of a Null and apply the C. Deformer as the last object in the hierarchy; I have to thank Dobromir from In Life Thrill  which passed me the this tip, go ahead and check out his resources since he is really good with Octane and Arnold and of course C4D.

With this technique you can  get more density, but you have to be careful with the geometry you use as the instance and the amount of hairs. 
You can check also another way of doing this using X particles here.
Thanks for watching.