Two-hand Touch and Flag Football
Kevin Martoken joined New York City’s Grassi and Co. as a fund accountant in 2013. When he is not administrating funds on behalf of clients, Kevin Martoken likes to stay active by participating in a recreational football league in New York City.

Gridiron football is the most popular sport in the United States. However, the overtly physical nature of the game makes it difficult for recreational and intramural leagues to follow collegiate or professional rules. In most amateur leagues, players follow either two-hand touch or flag football rules.

Both two-hand touch and flag football follow all the basic elements of American football. As the name might suggest, two-hand touch replaces the act of tackling a ball carrier. A legal touch requires defensive players to place both hands on the ball carrier at the same time. In addition, many leagues do not recognize bumps, pushes, or otherwise unnecessary contact as a legal touch in hopes of discouraging rough play.

Furthermore, two-hand touch games can implement a number of additional rules to mitigate the likelihood of injury. For example, many two-hand touch leagues do not recognize fumbles. If a player drops the ball, the play is ruled dead once the ball touches the ground.

As far as flag football, during a game all players wear an item of clothing or ribbon, generally around the waist. In order to down an opponent, defensive players must grab hold of the flag and remove it from the other player. A number of rules are associated with the removal of a flag, including the same unnecessary roughness guidelines associated with two-hand touch.
Two-hand Touch and Flag Football
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Two-hand Touch and Flag Football

Kevin Martoken joined New York City’s Grassi and Co. as a fund accountant in 2013. When he is not administrating funds on behalf of clients, Kevi Read More
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