Monolitos is integrated by two different styles of the products designed, in order to represent the opening of Japan to the West, a Japan adapted to Western customs and furniture but at the same time preserving essential details of its ancient culture.
 
During the time I reached for an inspiration in Japan, which was difficult inasmuch as this nation is full of wisdom in crafts and culture, in my personal opinion the relation between human beings-reverence to the nature-religion-philosophy was immensely important. Buddhism is “well-known” abroad and the philosophy within its ideals, such as: the respect among human beings, the control of your mind, level or concentration and appreciation for nature but in terms of a lifestyle “Shintoism” express a strong connection with mother nature.

If we compare Japan and Mexico we truly find some differences but I focused on the similarities and what these nations share in common with, in that case it took me to their natives roots and the origin of both countries. Before Mexico was conquered by Spanish colony and without the Christianity intervention, we had our own religion back times in the Aztec lands, which was based on nature deities “Aztec religion”.
 
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Nudity of the materials
 
Sometimes a pot sings out from its wheel-head, from all its related parts, and the potter may pause himself thinking. “No pattern this time –just a single good glaze- or none at all”, and hope the fire will bless with added strength and variety that which his hands have made.
 
Stone as a primitive material
 
Stone has been related to ancient times and it was one of the fist daily use materials for the begging of the humanity, modern times and industrialization has come to our lives and the perception for the use of this material is not that same as it used to before. Mexico has been familiar to this material and even nowadays sometimes we still use “molcajete” mexican version of mortar and pestle but if we consider other fields such as: architecture and prehispanic art, pyramids and sculptures are the best representation for the significance in our antique culture.
 
I decided not to use any artificial paint; otherwise the primitive and natural feeling would not be able to be appreciated. 
Fukui and its blue stone “Shakudani stone”
 
Mined long ago from Mt. Asuwa, shakudani stones were used in the construction of Fukui Castle’s stonewalls, roof tiles of homes, and myriad other applications. Fukui’s history is in many ways that of these very rocks.
 
Shakudani-rocks are representative of the prefecture’s geological resources, and their namederives from the location of their first discovery. Mined on Mt. Asuwa since the Kofun Period, they have seen used in stone Buddhist statues, lanterns, roof tiles, and more, a timeless treasure that has fueled traditional architecture here for centuries. When wet they take on a unique blue color, further enhancing their beauty.
 
Shakudani stone, having been extracted in Fukui Prefecture since Kofun Period around 1500 years ago, has the feature of turning into blue when it gets wet. Using Shakudani stone as the material, this high-quality product is carefully cut by craftsman one by one. The beauty and lightness of this material, which is also called "fairy bluestone" 
Monolitos
This project represents Japan as an adapted country to Western customs and furniture but at the same time preserving essential details of its ancient culture, such are the wood structures of tables and joints inspired by the roofs of the Shinto temples. 
Monolitos coffee and side table
 
Monolitos coffee and side table, コーヒーテーブル, サイドテーブル Stone turning lathe and Kyo-sashimono technique. Materials: Japanese Cypress, Shakudani stone.
Designer: Herminio Menchaca
Colaboration: Fukui Yogyo Co., Ltd. 福井窯業株式会社, Fukui. Miyazaki Mokuzai Wood Industries 宮崎木材工業, Kyoto. Edition: Year of production 2016 
 
 
Torii lamp
 
Torii hanging lamp鳥居吊りランプ Stone sculpting and kazari kanagu technique.
Materials: Washi (japanese paper), Shakudani stone.
Designer: Herminio Menchaca
Collaboration: Fukui Yogyo Co., Ltd. 福井窯業株式会社, Fukui.
Edition: Year of production 2016 
Monolitos Nipón
The products named "Ozen Table" and "Torii standing lamp" represent the origins of Japan. The Ozen table refers to individual tables that are used by members of a family during the Obon Festival and the tables used by Buddhist monks, where it is possible to store items inside of it. “Torii standing lamps” refers to the original position that Shinto gates are built, the product is used to illuminate from the floor, which displays the original social interaction that takes place in Japan while sitting on the tatami.
Monolitos nipón aims the purest traditions of Japan such as Obon Festival. The torii marks the entrance to the sacred grounds into Shinto shrine.
www.hiperobjetos.com/#/monolitos-nipon/ 
Ozen table
 
Ozen table お膳 テーブル Magewappa and stone turning lathe technique.
Materials: Akita cedar, Shakudani stone.
Designer: Herminio Menchaca
Collaboration: Fukui Yogyo Co., Ltd. 福井窯業株式会社, Fukui.
Kurikyu Magewappa まげわっぱ栗九, Akita.
Edition: Year in production 2016. 
Torii standing lamp
 
Torii standing lamp 鳥居ランプ
Stone sculpting and kazari kanagu technique.
Materials: Brass sheet, Shakudani stone y Washi (japanese paper).
Designer: Herminio Menchaca
Collaboration: Fukui Yogyo Co., Ltd. 福井窯業株式会社, Fukui.
Morimoto Kazari 森本錺金具製作, Kyoto.
Edition: Year in production 2016. 
Monolitos 800º
New color by burning
 
The natural attribute of this lightweight and ancient stone is the possibility to change its color by burning the stone or pouring water on it. For the tables and hanging lamp design parts, a burning process on the material was accomplished, considering a temperature of 800oc the final color turned out to be an orange-brownish tone.
 
The modification of the color was planned to be a process that did not involve chemical or dying elements.
www.hiperobjetos.com/#/monolitos800/ 
Process
 
The collection named Monolitos includes the origins of Japan and Mexico. For the proper cultural interpretation related to the products designed, I conducted an investigation where various issues were involved : anthropology , folklore, history and mythology of both countries , in order to find and decode the similar points of these cultures , topics such as Shinto and Aztec religion which are considered polytheistic , mythological deities different nature-based; as the similarity between the Shinto gods ; Raijin and Fujin , and Aztec gods Quetzalcoatl and Tlaloc . In both ancient cultures the stone was used as the main element for the construction of sacred places of worship; in the case of Japan: its doors to the Shinto temples, called Torii, and in the case of Mexico: the Aztec pyramids and Aztec calendar, considered such as a monolith which means is made from a single block of stone. 
 
www.hiperobjetos.com/#/process/ 
 
The intervention of Mexico and the opening of Japan to the World
 
When we talk about the intervention of Mexico during the reign of Moctezuma and the conquest of Hernan Cortes in 1521 it is clear that prior to this event, the Aztec lands remained isolat- ed by foreign nations and prehispanic villages , as result of this the Aztec Empire reached its "Golden Age" of its great development in marketing, natural resources, minerals, and science.
An answer to the mystery of how Japan could develop and flourish craft techniques and culture, this due to the isolation and use of the domestic product, this was the same cultural situation the Aztec culture went through.
 
During the Meiji (1868-1912) part of becoming a modern a civilized nation meant Japan struggled with the differences between traditions of craftsmanship that already existed in Japan and the frameworks of Western art. 
Monolitos
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Monolitos

Monolitos is integrated by two different styles of the products designed, in order to represent the opening of Japan to the West, a Japan adapted Read More
195
3220
5
Published: