Wall Studies: November - December 2015                                         
 
This series of objects is the product of an investigation into object typologies.  The intent of the investigation was to uncover potential new typologies within the broad territory of wall storage.  
 
By introducing unfamiliar materials into this territory, conflating well known wall-specific typologies, or by exploiting common human-wall relationships, I was able to generate a collection of exotic wall-storage objects ranging from absurd to practical.
Study 1: Soft Coatrack
 
Occupying the same functional niche as a classic coatrack, the Soft Coatrack contributes spatial flexibility because it can be stretched into a desired position.  It's made of cast silicone.
Study 2: Faux Bricks
 
The Faux Bricks make use of a common association. Walls are often made of bricks and so the semantic implication of a brick visible on a wall might be that the wall is made of bricks.  These bricks, when hung on the wall, might suggest that the wall is also made of bricks. They might also function as shelves or hooks.  
Study 3: Soft Shelf
 
The Soft Shelf rejects efforts to be associated with an existing typology.  Existing somewhere between a shelf and a coatrack, it makes use of silicone's elasticity to gently embrace most lighter objects and keep them suspended in place.  It's also made of cast silicone.
Study 4: Hook Screws
 
These small objects address the separation between two known typologies: hooks, and the screws often used to hold them in place.  They draw inspiration from the playful tool-dipped utility hooks commonly found in hardware stores.  The Hook Screws expand upon this niche by integrating their method of installation; their design affords more twisting leverage, and each one is coated in tool-dip to provide hand-friendly friction.  They are also robust in construction and a compelling graphic addition to empty wallspace.
Thanks for looking!
Wall Studies
291
2,445
8
Published:

Wall Studies

This series of objects is a product of an investigation into object typologies. The intent of the investigation was to uncover potential new typo Read More
291
2,445
8
Published: