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Heather Huey Millinery: Luxury Branding & Identity
HEATHER HUEY

In 2009, a fortuitous meeting through mutual friends at a New York Fashion Week party led to one of my strongest periods of creative work and collaboration over the next 4 years.
AESTHETIC
 
With this being my foray into identity design, I redesigned Heather Huey’s logo and simplified the tone/visual identity. Outside of the guidelines of designing for “iconic, fashionable, & sophisticated”, my personal keywords during exploratory were “monolithic, timeless, prehistoric, exoskeletal, and retina-burning”. 
 
My goal was to be hyper-specific and at the same time broad enough to encompass the breadth of her forthcoming collections (of which I had a preview of, and worked on the presentation release of).
 
In full honor of the notion that you do your most creative work when you're the hungriest (ie. the most bootstrapped), we next re-designed the presentation of her humble 10x10' studio showroom space with the humblest of means. During this process of working on a physical space, we devised some of the visual language / presentation devices which are still presently used to date.
 
Our next project was photography: documenting the new pieces in an elegant, cerebral, and unexpected but smarter way that would highlight her craftsmanship and architectural background.
For the look book / collection presentation, I created a template format to show both “in-application” and “in-essence” — a top left thumbnail schematic of how the piece is to be worn, paired to the main image showing the piece as a standalone concept.
 
For the website re-development (keep in mind this is 2009!), I wanted clean, airy, negative space. I chose a clean, left-side sliding jQuery menu navigation, and a right-panel presentation content layout where each collection image had navigation up/down arrows that would scroll page to the next content. I chose this over a contained image slider to allow for free-scrolling in the negative space. 
Now that I finished re-branding all major consumer-facing presentation outlets, I could begin streamlining internal business logistics.
 
BUSINESS LOGISTICS

Technical setup: I set up google apps email (for which anyone before 2013 is luckily grandfathered into), business phone, social media accounts, and began minor Google SEO.
Communications: In 2010, Heather and I focused on shaping tone and brand voice across press and all public communication mediums. Secondly, we set up business processes to handle things including piece rentals for photoshoots. 
 
OVERALL

Heather Huey pieces appeared in our very first W Magazine spread within 1.5 months of our rebranding launch; followed quickly by back-to-back Vogue Italia, British Vogue, American Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Tier 2 and 3 Vogue’s, and all top boutique niche Art-Fashion publications. We graciously attribute this waterfall top-down adoption by the core of the fashion creative world to two factors: 
1. We succeeded in distilling the essence of her pieces down to their no-frills raw core, which in the same vein as a model is to fashion designer, allows the stylist to understand the piece while being presented carte blanche on how to apply it. 
2. The discovery, referral, and invaluable support of Heather’s work by 1st Assistant Stylists— many of whom sent us personal compliments on the website and photographic presentation! We then gained the continued support of the top fashion stylists, and then the top photographers.    

To expand, in the year following relaunch in editorial star power alone, Heather Huey's couture headpieces were pulled by such stylists as Karl Templer, Patti Wilson, Lori Goldstein, Nicola Formichetti, Camilla Nickerson, Ludivine Poiblanc, Giovanna Battaglia, Nicoletta Santoro, Robbie Spencer, David Vandewal, and Bill Mullen.
Or if one is more familiar with photographers, her designs were photographed by Steven Meisel, Steven Klein, Miles Aldridge and Tom Munro for Vogue Italia; Mert & Marcus for Interview; Mario Sorrenti and Jean-Baptiste Mondino for W magazine; Mariano Vivanco for Vogue Hommes Japan; Mario Testino for V magazine; Miguel Reveriego, Greg Kadel and Ben Hassett for Numéro France; Paolo Roversi and Solve Sundsbo for Vogue China; Ellen von Unwerth for VMan; and Terry Richardson for Purple Fashion.
INDUSTRY COLLABORATIONS
 
2010 included further synergistic collaborations with designers Thakoon, Simon Spurr, Siki Im, and Christian Siriano for New York Fashion Week.
2010 also included a pop-up retail shop (designed by AO Architecture) under The Highline as part of BOFFO’s Building Fashion series. Other awarded fellows were Simon Spurr, Siki Im, Richard Chai, & Waris Ahluwalia.
What started off as a belief statement about her work communicated through logo design and photographic interpretation, was then living in a physical space for the public to see. Though in the moment we were going faster than we could fully absorb, reflecting in hindsight The Highline pop-up shop was a personal hallmark seeing my first branding project in my first retail installation. 
 
Heather Huey Millinery: Luxury Branding & Identity
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Heather Huey Millinery: Luxury Branding & Identity

HEATHER HUEY In 2009, a fortuitous meeting through mutual friends at a New York Fashion Week party led to one of my strongest periods of creativ Read More
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