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    Written by Una Mullally and published by The History Press, In the Name of Love is a new oral history which traces the history of the movement fo… Read More
    Written by Una Mullally and published by The History Press, In the Name of Love is a new oral history which traces the history of the movement for marriage equality in Ireland narrated by those who took a stand, including politicians, activists, artists, drag queens, lobbyists, feminists and those who rocked the boat. From the dawn of Irish LGBT activism to an organised protest movement, from the legislative battles fought to the personal stories that paved the way for visibility, In the Name Of Love is the story of how we got from the decriminalising of homosexuality 22 years ago to today’s new brave world. Read Less
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How we got to YES

On 22 May 2015, Ireland held a referendum on the subject of extending marriage rights to same-sex couples. With a resounding vote for 'yes', the first popular vote in world to legalise same-sex marriage, this became the culmination of one of the most rapid and transformative changes in Irish society over the last century. In this book, Una Mullally charts the development of the movement from its origins. This is an oral history that documents the movement for marriage equality with context from the 70s, 80s, and 90s, but primarily focussing on the legislative progress made from the 2000s driven by protest, individuals, media, as well as including the conflicts within the communities and various debates in and around marriage. 
 
I designed the front book cover for this wonderful project.
 

 
I did a lot of sketches at the commencement of this project. My first concept was around the visual language of social protest / debate / change. 
 
Protest ephemeral traditionally convey urgency and passion with a naive typographic and/or illustrated approach. Using polished or slick design in this forum would detract from the true essence of the artefact which is that the message conveyed is the true voice of the people.
My second concept was Expressive Typography. 
 
Typography can be used to convey emotion in a very dynamic suggestive way which is often more appropriate than attempting to illustrate a complex or broad idea with a single illustration.
My third set of sketches were about visualising the idea of Multiple Voices, Change and Equality, abstracted. 
 
Using symbolism and pattern as an illustrative style can help to articulate a complex idea or theme in a suggestive rather than overt manner. This was what was chosen.