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    When designing the graphic identity of You Love Me, You Love Me Not – an art exhibition that brought to Porto eighty pieces from one of the most … Read More
    When designing the graphic identity of You Love Me, You Love Me Not – an art exhibition that brought to Porto eighty pieces from one of the most important contemporary African art collections, the Sindika Dokolo Collection – we were faced with the following dilemma: how to express a sense of Africanness (that permeates the whole show, even the works by non-African artists) and, at the same time, avoid the clichés of “black” or “primitive” art that reduce it to half a dozen ethnographic platitudes? On the one side, we chose a traditional African element – a clothing pattern from a Seydou Keita photograph – and favoured the colours red and black (generally associated with the African continent and, in particular, with the Angolan national flag). On the other side, the overall graphic scheme – from the typographical strategy to the geometrical depuration – conveys the contemporary feel that defines the collection. The very rejection of a figurative solution reflects the iconoclastic nature of many of the pieces in the collection. Our design concept also plays on the exhibition’s title, geometrically suggesting a sort of “loves me/loves me not” game that brings to mind the ever faltering nature of our feelings towards Africa… Read Less
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You Love Me, You Love Me Not
Exhibition of Contemporary Art
from the Sindika Dokolo Collection
Porto, 2015 
When designing the graphic identity of You Love Me, You Love Me Not – an art exhibition that brought to Porto eighty pieces from one of the most important contemporary African art collections, the Sindika Dokolo Collection – we were faced with the following dilemma: how to express a sense of Africanness (that permeates the whole show, even the works by non-African artists) and, at the same time, avoid the clichés of “black” or “primitive” art that reduce it to half a dozen ethnographic platitudes? On the one side, we chose a traditional African element – a clothing pattern from a Seydou Keita photograph – and
favoured the colours red and black (generally associated with the African continent and, in particular, with the Angolan national flag). On the other side, the overall graphic scheme – from the typographical strategy to the geometrical depuration – conveys the contemporary feel that defines the collection.
 
The very rejection of a figurative solution reflects the iconoclastic nature of many of the pieces in the collection. Our design concept also plays on the exhibition’s title, geometrically suggesting a sort of “loves me/loves me not” game that brings to mind the ever faltering nature of our feelings towards Africa…