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    "Loop Service" depicts scenes described in "Ballad of Tabitha” a song by local band, The Boredphucks in a collaboration with Ray Tan The Boredph… Read More
    "Loop Service" depicts scenes described in "Ballad of Tabitha” a song by local band, The Boredphucks in a collaboration with Ray Tan The Boredphucks' Revolution 69 demo played a pivotal role in inspiring both artists to pursue individual interests in their respective fields. It was at the age of 15, that The Boredphucks music fed these scenes on on repeat - much like a loop service bus ride. The art piece centers around a revolving mechanism much like a turntable with a vinyl record playing. But instead of the familiar black discs, several pieces of perspex with an element from the song drawn on them move against the backdrop of the seats at the back of an SBS bus. All of them (“Tabitha” and her computer, the boy in a NOFX shirt and his guitar) are held together with a brass rod, secured with drum hi-hat washers and a guitar plectrum. The drum felt washers are integral in holding the different layers of the piece together - a tribute to Wayne Seah, The Borephucks' late drummer, who kept the beat. This exhibition sees 50 local designers and artists transforming vinyl records into pieces of artwork which are put up for auction, with all proceeds going towards Thunder Rock School to provide a music education outreach program specifically catered to financially disadvantaged children. Read Less
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"Loop Service" depicts scenes described in "Ballad of Tabitha” a song by local band, The Boredphucks in a collaboration with Ray Tan

The Boredphucks' Revolution 69 demo played a pivotal role in inspiring both artists to pursue individual interests in their respective fields. It was at the age of 15, that The Boredphucks music fed these scenes on on repeat - much like a loop service bus ride. 

The art piece centers around a revolving mechanism much like a turntable with a vinyl record playing. But instead of the familiar black discs, several pieces of perspex with an element from the song drawn on them move against the backdrop of the seats at the back of an SBS bus. All of them (“Tabitha” and her computer, the boy in a NOFX shirt and his guitar) are held together with a brass rod, secured with drum hi-hat washers and a guitar plectrum. The drum felt washers are integral in holding the different layers of the piece together - a tribute to Wayne Seah, The Borephucks' late drummer, who kept the beat.

This exhibition sees 50 local designers and artists transforming vinyl records into pieces of artwork which are put up for auction, with all proceeds going towards Thunder Rock School to provide a music education outreach program specifically catered to financially disadvantaged children.