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    I traveled to the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab in Laurel, Maryland to photograph the historic Pluto Flyby for Bill Nye and The Planetary Soc… Read More
    I traveled to the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab in Laurel, Maryland to photograph the historic Pluto Flyby for Bill Nye and The Planetary Society. After over 9 years and 3 billion miles, the NASA New Horizons spacecraft sent back our first ever look at this mysterious world. What a day for humanity. Read Less
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I traveled to the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab in Laurel, Maryland to photograph the historic Pluto Flyby for Bill Nye and The Planetary Society. After over 9 years and 3 billion miles, the NASA New Horizons spacecraft sent back our first ever look at this mysterious world. What a day for humanity.
The crowd erupted into celebration at Johns Hopkins APL as New Horizons completed the historic flyby of Pluto at 7:49a EST.
Principal investigator Alan Stern hugs mission design leader Yanping Guo moments after the historic Pluto flyby. 
Alan Stern and Will Grundy hold an updated USPS postage stamp after Tuesday's historic flyby of Pluto.
Annette Tombaugh-Sitze, daughter of Clyde Tombaugh (who discovered Pluto in 1930), watches the New Horizons Pluto flyby Tuesday morning at Johns Hopkins APL. Some of Clyde's ashes are on board the New Horizons spacecraft.
Alan Stern and Bill Nye salute Pluto.
 
Leslie Young and Yanping Guo of New Horizons
Bill Nye speaks with the family of Clyde Tombaugh.
The Tombaugh family
The auditorium burst into applause Tuesday night after the New Horizons phone home signal was received at mission control.
Charon is revealed to the press room.
The press room reacts to the new image of Pluto's incredible ice mountains that was released on Wednesday. 
Bill Nye was simply unstoppable.
The New Horizons team and Tombaugh family celebrate moments after New Horizons completed its historic flyby of Pluto.