This is an example of behavioural modelling, the objective of which is to produce a 3D model that has realistic properties, allowing design improvements that would otherwise require prototyping The proportional weight of each limb was adjusted to simulate a real life weight distribution which could then be used to optimise the centre of gravity by altering the frame geometry.

A strength analysis of the crank arm was also conducted on this model, the axle was fixed in position and an approximate weight of rider applied to the pedal. Using the software, colour display weak spots in the design can be identified and simple modifications can be made to develop an appropriate safety factor.

A basic BMX bicycle was created, several different components were assembled into the software. The relevant material properties were applied to each part to allow realistic simulation and analysis.

Different sized blocks were given a mass to represent the users weight and mounted to the bike. The centre of gravity can then be identified and refined.
To make the simulation as realistic as possible a mannequin was created. The average weight for the height of user provided was found and spread throughout the limbs using a table. The table provided individual body parts as a percentage of the overall mass.
The centre of gravity was optimised by varying chosen dimensions from the bicycles geometry. A composite image of the bicycle before (green) and after (red) the optimization process is shown below.
The dynamic assembly of the bicycles components and mannequins limbs allowed simulation and analysis of the bicycle in use. The graph below shows how the centre of gravity deviates from it's ideal location as the user pedals.
BMX bicycle
0
24
0
Published:

BMX bicycle

This project was for a unit titled 'Advanced modelling' undertaken at university. The unit focuses on behavioural modelling, simulation and analy Read More
0
24
0
Published: