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    Interactive sonic tag game, 2012 Sonotag is a tag game where one player takes the role of a rabbit and the other player the role of the wolf. The… Read More
    Interactive sonic tag game, 2012 Sonotag is a tag game where one player takes the role of a rabbit and the other player the role of the wolf. They meet in an imaginary playfield of approximately 3x3m. They are blindfolded and each hear sound sent wirelessly to their headphones. The computer calculates the distance between the two players and their distance to the border of the playfield. Based on these distances different sonic feedbacks are played back to the participants. The wolf has to catch the rabbit and the rabbit has to flee. If one of them gets too close to the border the other one gets additional sonic information about their location. The sounds were a mix of pitched voice samples, breathing, heart beats, growling and electric discharge signals. The participants were tracked by the Kinect which was mounted on the ceiling. The individual sounds were transmitted through the left and right channels of a radio signal. In collaboration with Oliver Kalbermatter, Daniel Mischler and Matthias Kappeler Read Less
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Interactive sonic tag game, 2012

Sonotag is a tag game where one player takes the role of a rabbit and the other player the role of the wolf. They meet in an imaginary playfield of approximately 3x3m. They are blindfolded and each hear sound sent wirelessly to their headphones. The computer calculates the distance between the two players and their distance to the border of the playfield. Based on these distances different sonic feedbacks are played back to the participants. The wolf has to catch the rabbit and the rabbit has to flee. If one of them gets too close to the border the other one gets additional sonic information about their location. The sounds were a mix of pitched voice samples, breathing, heart beats, growling and electric discharge signals. The participants were tracked by the Kinect which was mounted on the ceiling. The individual sounds were transmitted through the left and right channels of a radio signal.

In collaboration with Oliver Kalbermatter, Daniel Mischler and Matthias Kappeler