Re-Framing Danish Design
TWO DESIGNERS TWEAK DANISH ICONS /
By Lauren Grieco, Frame Magazine
 
Influenced by the Bauhaus movement in Germany, 20th-century Danish designers upgraded their long-standing tradition of handcrafted woodwork with the aid of modern industrial developments. The function-driven yet ae- sthetically pleasing results of that step forward benefited from the scale of the burgeoning manufacturing industry and became available to a broader public. When we hear the term ‘Danish design’, the images that spring to mind are of icons like Arne Jacobsen’s Egg Chair (1956) and the Panton Chair, which was launched in the mid-1960s – as well as the more contemporary designs still emerging from the nation’s creative industry.
 
An ever-evolving society has ever-evolving needs, which occur in response to advances in science and technology and to new applications of the materials, systems and structures that accompany such advances. Human inter- action, particularly in the field of communications, has experienced tremendous shifts in the past six or seven decades. Design has no choice but to adapt to these constant changes. At the heart of Re-Framing Danish Design, an exhibition organized by online publication DANISHTM and Frame magazine, is a 21st-century interpretation of Danish design. The show invites visitors to view Denmark’s classic and contemporary pieces through a global lens. As any seasoned treasure-hunter knows, a second glance is worth its weight in gold. Re-Framing Danish Design proves the point.
 
Robert Thiemann, editor in chief of Frame, asked two international designers to contribute to the exhibition by injecting their perspectives and personalities into a sampling of ten objects, each from a different Danish company. Thiemann encouraged Sebastian Herkner of Germany and Niek Pulles of the Netherlands to translate the objects as they saw fit: no holds barred. The designs they chose include Brdr. Krüger’s Tray Table by Hans Bølling; Plateau, a new table by Søren Rose Studio for dk3; Caravaggio, Cecilie Manz’s pendant for Lightyears; the Montana storage system; and Nordic Antique, a hand-painted wallpaper by Heidi Zilmer. Among the seating designs are two by Arne Jacobsen: his Series 7TM chair, produced by Fritz Hansen, and the Tongue Chair, available from Howe. Others are J39 by Børge Mogensen, produced by Fredericia Furniture; Kaare Klint’s Safari Chair, made by Carl Hansen & Søn; and the Fiber Chair, designed by Iskos-Berlin for Muuto.
 
Having studied in Offenbach am Main, where he now runs a studio, Sebastian Herkner is a successful product designer who’s interested in the fusion of new technologies and artisanal crafts, with an eye to accentuating the
beauty of materials and the details of an object. With a host of designs in production – examples are Collar, a pendant for Gubi; Bell, a coffee table for Classicon; and Banjooli and Coat, collections for Moroso – Herkner is known for a sophisticated style that reflects clean-lined craftsmanship and clear references to the roots of Danish design. ‘The city of Offenbach radiates traditional craftsmanship, sensory perception and passion – the same elements you find in Danish design,’ he says. ‘My way of thinking and analysing is German, but I don’t always stick to the German mantra of sim- plicity and functionality. Design is also about beauty, passion, sensuousness.’
 
Based in Amsterdam, designer Niek Pulles explores the tactile connections between materials and the human body.
His work, which blurs the boundaries that separate product design and fashion, features a dynamic that highlights the development of his living, breathing ‘foamboy monsters’, most recently seen frozen in a state of suspended animation at Comme des Garçons stores worldwide. At Dutch Design Week 2014, Pulles staged mannequins wearing fashions of the future, afloat in a tropical island-cum-nightclub as part of the Modebelofte installation. He recognizes the link between his work and the task at hand: ‘Danish design is very close to the body. I see a beautiful and elegant relationship with human shapes.’ Referring to the iconic objects that he’s chosen for Re-Framing Danish Design, he continues: ‘They are sculptures, pieces that are very delicate and made with lots of love and dedication. I want to respect their origins but execute the designs with my own signature – give them my personal identity.’
 
By initiating a reinterpretation of Danish icons, both classic and contemporary, Re-Framing Danish Design provokes an open-ended discussion about the impact of global influences on design, while addressing society’s continually changing needs.
FRAMEWEB.COM 
FRITZ HANSEN’S 7TM SERIES CHAIR BY ARNE JACOBSEN
BECOMES /
‘FOAM BONE CHAIR – SOFT SURPRICE’
“This chair reminds me a lot of the female pelvis. The bone structure and the shape of it inspired me to translate this piece into a soft boned chair. For this chair I re-used leftovers from my foam projects and trans- lated it into a bone structure story.” 
HOWE’S
TONGUE CHAIR
BY ARNE JACOBSEN
BECOMES /
‘MACRO TONGUE – LICK IT GOOD’
“Zooming in on the human body always fascinates me – especially the tongue.
It’s a monster, full of big and rough struc- tures. Translating that to the sophisticated chair of Arne Jacobsen is my goal. Com- plete with a slimy and heavy texture.” 
BRDR. KRÜGER’S TRAY TABLE
BY HANS BØLLING
BECOMES / ‘TUK TUK MONSTER TRUCK TABLE – VAVOOM’
“My fascination for car culture and pim- ping cars is big. So pimping a transportable tray table was immediately a logical choice for me. I looked at different monster trucks and tuk tuk taxies, and combined the two into a crazy mix. The result is a 4x4 heavy beast tea table.” 
CARL HANSEN & SØN’S SAFARI CHAIR
BY KAARE KLINT
 
BECOMES /

‘KLAMBOE CHAIR
– ESSENTIAL ON A SAFARI’
“What is one of the problems on a safari or in the jungle? Mosquitoes! The look
of a Mosquito net became my inspiration for this chair, as well as the way your body leaves an imprint in the net when sitting naked.” 
CARAVAGGIO LAMP BY CECILIE MANZ FOR LIGHTYEARS
BECOMES /
‘SWIRLING LAMP – LIQUID MARBLE’
“The title reminded me of the dramatic hyper-realistic Italian painter. Using the drama in a more abstract way and the paint as a material to give this lamp a dramatic and romantic fluid Italian marbled look.” 
THE FIBER CHAIR BY ISKOS-BERLIN FOR MUUTO
BECOMES / ‘FLOCKED UP’
“I was inspired by the idea of fibres and transforming it into a more human touch – such as the softness of hair. By using flock techniques, I wanted this chair to appear hairy.” 
PLATEAU
BY SØREN ROSE STUDIO FOR DK3
BECOMES / ‘MOULTING’
“These tables had some rough edges. So I decided to give them a new skin that was tighter. Resulting in a skin that looks like it is in a periodic moulting process.” 
PLATEAU
BY SØREN ROSE STUDIO FOR DK3
BECOMES / ‘MOULTING’
“These tables had some rough edges. So I decided to give them a new skin that was tighter. Resulting in a skin that looks like it is in a periodic moulting process.” 
FRITZ HANSEN’S 7TM SERIES CHAIR BY ARNE JACOBSEN
 
BECOMES /

‘FOAM BONE CHAIR – SOFT SURPRISE’
“This chair reminds me a lot of the female pelvis. The bone structure and the shape of it inspired me to translate this piece into a soft boned chair. For this chair I re-used leftovers from my foam projects and trans- lated it into a bone structure story.” 
THE MONTANA FURNITURE SYSTEM BY PETER J. LASSEN
BECOMES / ‘REBELS’
 - Montana Meltdown
“I use the system as a deconstruction by assembling different sizes and creating new ‘bodies / skeletons’. Adding a naked and rebellious vibe to the Montana system.” 

THE MONTANA FURNITURE SYSTEM BY PETER J. LASSEN
BECOMES / ‘REBELS’
 - Montana Meltdown 
“I use the system as a deconstruction by assembling different sizes and creating new ‘bodies / skeletons’. Adding a naked and rebellious vibe to the Montana system.” 

THE MONTANA FURNITURE SYSTEM BY PETER J. LASSEN
BECOMES / ‘REBELS’
 - Montana Meltdown 
“I use the system as a deconstruction by assembling different sizes and creating new ‘bodies / skeletons’. Adding a naked and rebellious vibe to the Montana system.” 
HAND PAINTED WALLPAPER BY ZILMERS
BECOMES /
‘LASER CUT WALLPAPER – LAYERED CAKE’
“The idea was to make the wallpaper into 3D. So I laser cut another classic pattern and used the leftovers to make a more voluminous pattern, almost like an embossed pattern.” 
HAND PAINTED WALLPAPER BY ZILMERS
BECOMES /
‘LASER CUT WALLPAPER – LAYERED CAKE’
“The idea was to make the wallpaper into 3D. So I laser cut another classic pattern and used the leftovers to make a more voluminous pattern, almost like an embossed pattern.” 

Re-Framing Danish Design by Frame & DANISHTM

To celebrate the launch of its online magazine, DANISHTM joined forces with renowned Frame magazi- ne to develop Re-Framing Danish Design—an exhibition that will allow two international designers to put their personal spin on 10 new and classic Danish icons.

The two lucky designers invited to add their personal touches are Sebastian Herkner from Germany and Niek Pulles from the Netherlands. Herkner studied product design at the HfG Offenbach am Main Uni- versity, and he previously worked with Moroso and Gubi. Pulles studied at the Design Academy in Eind- hoven, and he likes to explore the interaction between body and material. He is known for his Foamboys, which are used by Comme des Garçons.
The designers have channelled their creativity into these designs in any way they liked. They could inter- pret or update each pieces, or they could generate a spatial experience with the objects. The two designers bring very different perspectives to the exhibition: one is artistic and the other analytical.
 
The Human Body

The theme of Niek Pulles’ exhibition concentrates on zooming in on the human body and searching for cultural crossovers.
“My biggest inspirations are humans, animals and bodies. My fascination with the body started at a young age, and vehicles are also a great interest of mine; I used to draw cars everyday—sometimes only a line of car grills, because they reminded me of faces/characters”, says Pulles.

Increasing Details

Sebastian Herkner picked up the magnifying glass for his exhibition, which he calls “Increasing Details”. All 10 pieces will be presented with a separate developed element, which will zoom in on one detail from each product that Herkner was drawn to during his analysis. “‘Increasing Details’ is very personal and
to the point”, says Herkner. He continues, “We found that it was also necessary to understand the story behind the design and the approach of the designer. Therefore, for the last couple of months, we have surrounded ourselves with the products”.
 
10 Iconic Danish Design Objects
Re-Framing Danish Design includes 10 Danish companies and objects, Brdr. Krüger’s Tray Table by Hans Bølling, Fredericia’s J39 by Børge Mogensen, Fritz Hansen’s 7TM Series chair by Arne Jacobsen, Montana’s Montana furniture system by Peter J. Lassen, Lightyear’s Caravaggio lamp by Cecilie Manz, Carl Hansen & Søn’s Safari Chair by Kaare Klint, handpainted wallpaper by Zilmers, dk3’s brand-new “Plateau” side table by Søren Rose Studio, HOWE’s Tongue chair by Arne Jacobsen, and MUUTO’s Fiber Chair.

About DANISHTM

DANISHTM is an online magazine promoting Danish design and architecture through articles and com- pany profiles. All of our content online is ready for immediate download for journalists to use.
The organisation behind DANISHTM is Danish Design and Architecture Initiative (DDAI), which was for- med in 2012 and commissioned by the Ministry of Business and Growth, the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Ministry of Culture.
 
www.danish.tm
 
For further information contact:
Lisa Kjær Jensen
Head of Communications
Phone: 45 25942409 E-mail: lisa@ddai.dk 
 
 
 
Re-Framing Danish Design
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Re-Framing Danish Design

Re-Framing Danish Design Frame and DANISH™ invited Niek Pulles & Sebastian Herkner to REFRAME 10 iconic danish designs.
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