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    In the winter of 2011, I was contacted by my friend and creative collaborator, Cameron Hu, who was living off of Tahrir Square during the histori… Read More
    In the winter of 2011, I was contacted by my friend and creative collaborator, Cameron Hu, who was living off of Tahrir Square during the historic uprising. In addition to his “on the ground” stories, he was amassing an amazing collection of flyers, pamphlets, newspapers, posters from Tahrir Square that were to become the Tahrir Documents project. How could these documents be accessed by scholars, students, and journalists overseas? After reviewing photos and scans of this ephemera of the revolution with Hu and colleagues, we launched a website to house these scans and photos alongside English translations. Tahrir Documents sought to provide a supplementary narrative to the phenomenon dubbed by journalists, historians, and scholars as “The Twitter Revolution.” My contributions to this project included the design of the Tahrir Documents logo and full development of the website. I also edited and disseminated the scans and photos of primary source documents arriving from overseas to the editorial and translation teams in the United States. Tahrir Documents is included in several research libraries and archives, including the University of Texas at Austin Human Rights Documentation Initiative. The physical collection is currently housed by UCLA in the Special Collections Department of the Charles E. Young Research Library. From the editors: Initiated in March 2011, Tahrir Documents is an ongoing effort to archive and translate activist papers from the 2011 Egyptian uprising and its aftermath. Materials are collected from demonstrations in Cairo’s Tahrir Square and published in complete English translation alongside scans of the original documents. The project is not affiliated with any political organization, Egyptian or otherwise. Read Less
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