• Add to Collection
  • Tools Used
  • About

    About

    This booklet was a final project for Dr. Omise'eke Natasha Tinsley, a courageous woman and educator who taught a class called "Black Spiritualiti… Read More
    This booklet was a final project for Dr. Omise'eke Natasha Tinsley, a courageous woman and educator who taught a class called "Black Spiritualities." I came to her looking for help. I entered into a project and world that did not belong to me, equipped with an impotent toolkit of short-term, product-focused graphic design strategies and obliviousness to my own positionality. Each week, I experienced new personal discoveries. The term “societal value” expanded from simply getting the word out about injustice, to include the privileging of spiritual epistemologies and lived experience outside my own, and a rethinking of a traditional design process to accommodate value shifts within myself. I am not an expert in Black Studies, feminism, or community organizing. I know now that there is always work to be done, not just for society, or as a designer, but actually on ourselves as human beings. In one of my recordings from Summer 2014, I waited in a church parking lot for six hours to interview parishioners. I was advised afterward, “You are not black. You will never be black. You will never know what it is to go through this life as a black person.” They were right. I am not black, but I could not sit quietly and observe things that I can only call evil. And I know that “design thinking” is not going to eradicate those evils. I am not black, but I can accompany those in struggle and make tangible the synthesis of so much research and so many stories. To learn about ourselves and come to understand our roles in a struggle, we must un-learn many myths of design pedagogy. The contents of this booklet document this process of learning through un-learning. Read Less
    Published: