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    On this project, I designed the new Ensō brand for a multinational executive and corporate coaching firm. An Ensō is a circle that is hand-drawn… Read More
    On this project, I designed the new Ensō brand for a multinational executive and corporate coaching firm. An Ensō is a circle that is hand-drawn in one or two uninhibited brushstrokes to express a moment when the mind is free to let the body create. Ensō symbolizes enlightenment, liberation, strength and creativity. Ensō is one of the most powerful representations of minimalism. I followed that aspect with this logo, used the letter 'O' as the 'Ensō circle’. Red macron is a homage to ‘hanko’. Hanko is a seal that is being used in Japan since AD 57. First, the emperors use it as their signatures, then noble people, samurais and finally it comes into general use throughout Japanese society in 1870. In Japanese art, you often see the red hanko in the corner of the artworks. It is a signature, a mark that you leave behind, after you create your art piece. On this logo, the red stripe is Enso’s minimalist version of hanko. Its signature. Read Less
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Homage To A Tradition
ENSO / Branding 
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Enso is an executive and corporate coaching firm that aims to make organizations remember who they are and why they exist at the first place. Having three offices in Dublin, Bucharest and Istanbul, Enso offers strategic training and transformational coaching services that empower leaders and encourage development in the workplace.
An Enso is a circle that is hand-drawn in one or two uninhibited brushstrokes to express a moment when the mind is free to let the body create. Enso symbolizes enlightenment, liberation, strength and creativity.
 
Enso is one of the most powerful representations of minimalism. Following that aspect, I used letter 'o' as the Enso circle and emphasized it with the red macron which is a homage to 'hanko'. Hanko is a seal that is used in Japan since AD 57. First, the emperors had used it as their signatures, then noble people, samurais and finally it came into general use throughout Japanese society in 1870.
 
In Japanese art, we often see the red hanko in the corner of the art pieces. It is a mark that you leave behind, after you create your art. On this logo, the red stripe is Enso's minimalist version of hanko. Its signature.