• Add to Collection
  • Tools Used
  • About

    About

    An ode to a nation obsessed with eating, #FOOD is a celebration of Singapore’s great culinary heritage. May this serving whet your appetite and g… Read More
    An ode to a nation obsessed with eating, #FOOD is a celebration of Singapore’s great culinary heritage. May this serving whet your appetite and grant you visual delight. Dig in! A tie-up with sister stationery initiative The Little / Little Co., this 20-page zine is self-published on an inkjet printer using water-resistant pigment ink. The first edition of 50 is hand-numbered. Read Less
    Published:
An ode to a nation obsessed with eating, #FOOD is a celebration of Singapore’s great culinary heritage. May this serving whet your appetite and grant you visual delight. Dig in!
 
A tie-up with sister stationery initiative The Little / Little Co., this 20-page zine is self-published on an inkjet printer using water-resistant pigment ink. The first edition of 50 is hand-numbered.
 
A sequel featuring local Malay and Indian dishes is currently being planned.
 
Buy the zine and poster here.
Half-boiled egg:
A typical way to enjoy breakfast in South-East Asia is to have a cup of tea, coffee or milo and two half-boiled eggs with a generous dose of light (if you’re Hokkien) or dark (if you’re Teochew) soy sauce. Toast with kaya and butter is usually included as well.
Tang yuan:
Tang yuan (or glutinous rice balls) can be served with ginger or peanut soup, brown sugar syrup and even soy bean milk. Eaten during yuan xiao (first full moon of the Lunar New Year) and winter solstice, they symbolise family union.
 
Campbell's alphabet soup:
Many a child’s introduction to canned soup, the alphabet variant is fondly preferred by mums as it introduces a fun distraction for kids to learn their ABCs while eating.
Har gow:
One of two quintessential items in Cantonese dim sum, har gow is best eaten hot while the outer skin is soft and moist. It is also the standard by which the entire course is judged. The best har gow have paper-thin skins that do not break even when lifted with chopsticks.
 
Siew mai:
The consummate counterpart to har gow in Cantonese dim sum, siew mai is best eaten hot while the outer skin is soft and moist. While modern taste has given rise to a variation using chicken, the traditional (and superior) base ingredient is pork.
Egg tarts:
A fluffy and oh-so-sinful pastry, egg tarts are perhaps the best way to end a dim sum course, flushed down with a cup of hot tea. The combination of crispy layers of pastry and a delicate creamy egg filling is a match made in heaven.
 
Noodles:
Noodles can be thick or thin, round or flat. A staple of East Asian countries, they are eaten hot, cold, dry, in soups stewed with meat or dipped with sauces. Their seemingly endless strands symbolise longevity.
Rice:
Probably the ultimate representation of Asian cuisine, rice has long been cherished for its purity and simplicity. Besides being a staple food, rice can also be used to make paper, glue, flour and wine.
The first edition of 50 is hand-numbered.
The A3 poster gives you a dozen reasons to whet your appetite!
Custom square posters are available. PM for requests.
Buy the zine and poster here.
Thanks for appreciating.