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    Forever Green-Eyed Aeshna isoceles, the Green-Eyed Hawker also known as the Norfolk Hawker is rare specimen classified as Threatened for the po… Read More
    Forever Green-Eyed Aeshna isoceles, the Green-Eyed Hawker also known as the Norfolk Hawker is rare specimen classified as Threatened for the portuguese territory, with a small number of known populations, highly located, and probably in decline | This series of photographs contributed to assign a new location for this species | A contribution to the understanding of their habitat and ecology | After nearly two years living as nymphs, they emerge as dragonflies... Read Less
    Published:
The Green Eyes of the Flying Yellow God
 
Aeshna isoceles, the Green-Eyed Hawker
also known as the Norfolk Hawker
 
Update
Altough this rare specimen is classified as Threatened for the portuguese territory, highly located and with a small number of known populations,
new data suggest that known populations are becoming stable
as new populations, such as this one, are being dicovered...
 
This series of photographs contributed to assign a new location for this species.
A simple contribution to the understanding of their habitat and ecology.
 
After nearly two years living as nymphs, they emerge as dragonflies...
Male
Female
Mating wheel (Male on top, female bellow) - September, 2015
Late September, 2015
Late September, 2015
Late September, 2015
Late September, 2015
Late September, 2015
October 2015
October 2015
November (!) 2015
 
Today, November 9th 2015, gathering all the stuff to come back home from field work with two friends, in the middle of the marsh, i went back again to an area where dry reeds were high, to show to my fellow colleague the place where some of mine in flight shots of Anax ephippiger were capture when, out from the blue, the he was... hunting, at the end of the day, the green-eyed hawker, mysteriously still flying in November!! First records with some young specimens date late April... The end of the day arrived quickly, and i only had the time to process my last shots of the day, to share them with all.
A little story for today, november 16th 2015... At 16:00 o'clock in the afternoon, a clouded sky remind me that this was the end of the day. Although a bit late, and with scarce light, this dragonfly appeared.
Well, this dragonfly, of which I really don't know what it is more to think about...
 
We are in november, that's a fact. This species is still up, that's a (crazy) fact, and there's more...
As a female, more evidences of adulthood should be present, like fading blured orange through out its body, stripped/bite/ragged wings due to male captures, and so on, only the eyes suggest this adulthood...
but no, this female looks like that hatch up a few weeks ago, one month or two...
well, as I was saying, I don't now what to think more... I'm dazzled.
Aeshna isoceles, male in flight...
 
.This was the first record for this species in its new location.

A contribution to a better understanding of the biology and ecology of this species
New location added
New reproductive theories about its possible generations
and winter right at our door steps
 
Captured during late April, May, June, September, October and surprisingly in November 2015
 
You captured me, for sure*
2015@RMF