Orthus Dual Screen Smartphone Concept
The story
 
Nokia N800 Internet Tablet has been revealed in January 2007 and later, on May the 4th, it has been presented in Moscow. The device has been built around an idea of uncompromised web browsing  and multimedia consumption. Full featured web browsing with Adobe Flash support, pure multitasking capabilities, Linux-based operating system, high resolution display (it had 2.5 times more pixels than the iPhone), front facing loud speakers, pressure sensitive touchscreen all packed in a signature body of Nokia Design. Although it has been marketed as an experimental device, N800 got its reputation as a genuine state of the art creation. 8 years later I've decided to re-think the concept behind the Internet Tablet and add a modern touch to it.
 
 
 
 
 
Flick of the wrist
 
Orthus uses a unique slider/twist combo mechanism. Not only it is eye-catching but it also minimizes overall device thickness and simplifies structure without any functional sacrifices. Titanium alloy scissor blades are interconnected with fully enclosed micro bearings. It's extemely compact when closed and yet forms robust dimensional structure when opened. Linear spring finishes the satisfactory feel of the two positional slider.
 
 
The whole construction of Orthus has been thought through at unprecedented level of attention to details. Assembly process, parts availibility, material specifications — everything has been taken into account while designing and engineering this smartphone. To the last screw.
 
 
 
 
 
Even better than the real thing
 
Like its prototype from 2007, Orthus has been designed to redefine multimedia experience on mobile devices. Each of two 5.1" ultrawide displays with 2560×1080 resolution (21:9 aspect ratio) delivers unprecedented cinematic experience and by being additionaly agumented with the front-facing four speaker array the smartphone trully raises the bar for on-the-go entertainment to new heights.
 
 
 
 
 
Omni-facing camera
 
Unique two positional slider mechanism allows Orthus to use its 12 megapixel wide angle camera for both regular and self portrait shooting. With a single tap in camera application you can enable second display on the back and use the smartphone the same way as you'd use regular front-facing camera on a regular phone.
Just with flash and much better results.
 
 
 
 
 
Sense of perspective
 
Throwing in two displays doesn't equal multiplying screen space by two. Desktop users, that utilize dual or tripple display configurations usually say that they find that layout more comfortable than just using enormous single display instead. Visually separated environments help user to organize information streams for better and more responsive interaction. But there should be a suitable user interface for that and Sailfish OS with its multitasking core and deep gestures implementation is suited to handle such an advanced environment better than anything.
With a little help.
 
 
 
 
Orthus version of Sailfish OS uses three-finger gestures to for all multiscreen interactions. By default each display acts as a separate environment where you can open different apps or go to various home screens independently. All one finger gestures work as usual. Three-finger pinch out on any opened app will extend it to the second screen in "Side-by-side" mode. Pinch out again to enable Perspective Mode and that's where things get interesting.
 
 
 
 
Using two frontal sensors and an IR laser emmiter (that also works as a proximity sensor) Intel® RealSense™ technology can precisely track your eyes position relative to Orthus and use this information to create virtual plane "deeper" than the surface of the display so you will be able to actually lean and peek behind the screen border due to parallax effect. You can always disable Perspective Mode when you don't need it just by three finger pinching in. That easy.

 
One-handed use
 
Although Orthus has two 5.1" 21:9 displays that form an extraordinary 6.3" 4:3 UltraHD canvas, its dimensions are even smaller than your typical smartphone these days. By utilizing tissue conductive speakerphone technology, that vibrates touchscreen glass to generate sound that goes straight to your inner ear, almost all the surface is covered by the display.
 
 
Handmade
 
In 2007 Nokia N800 had a resistive pressure sensitive touchscreen that has been not only the key to precise control of small UI elements but also enabled creative tableteers to use the handheld as their personal canvas. Now in 2015 Orthus carries an inductive pen with 512 pressure levels along with a customizable button on the side. So you won't get lost wether you will need to sign a document, remotely access your workstation or just sketch a doodle.
 
 
Orthus Dual Screen Smartphone Concept
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Orthus Dual Screen Smartphone Concept

Re-imagining the concept of pocketable internet tablet.
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Published:

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