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    A humanist sans-serif typeface, Tantular is especially tailored for latin & various Indonesian traditional script, including Balinese, Batak, Bug… Read More
    A humanist sans-serif typeface, Tantular is especially tailored for latin & various Indonesian traditional script, including Balinese, Batak, Buginese, Javanese (in development), and Kawi script. With such diverse aesthetics, special attention is given to balance uniformity with distinct features of each script. Read Less
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Tantular is a humanist sans-serif typeface tailored for latin and traditional Indonesian scripts. Blending ancient heritage with modern sensibilities, Tantular sought to create a uniform style for latin, the ornate Bali & Javanese script, as well as the geometric Batak & Buginese script. With such diverse aesthetics, special attention is given to bring harmony between scripts (hopefully) without sacrificing too much legibility in either one. As of May 2015, Tantular already has latin, Batak, Bugis, Balinese, and Kawi, an ancient form of Bali and Javanese.
 
Notes on the uniformity of Tantular
 
Though Tantular promotes a "uniform style" for latin and Indonesian scripts, you might notice how the each script has different anatomy, most notably the terminals; where the prominently pointed terminals of Bali & Kawi is very much different from its Latin counterpart. This is intentional. I made Tantular with the goal of making a legible body text regardless of script, but I noticed that a rigid uniform style might not work so well. Typographic anatomy that works for latin might lessen the legibility of Bali and vice versa. So different treatment is given to each script, keeping in line with their distinct features and text formats. 
 
The Bali and Kawi script are inherently ornate, with numerous and varied counters. This resulted in heavier type weight when left unadjusted. To adress this, pointed terminals are used to enlarge counters and increase legibility, as both script always have pointed terminals in their natural context. In Balinese, where shapes are the most extreme, further adjustments are made to balance its weight by slightly reducing the stroke's weight.
 
In Batak and Bugis, the opposite applies. Strokes are made slightly thicker due to their simple, geometric nature and large counters. Batak in particular was quite difficult to balance, since the shape of the letters are more variable compared to other Indonesian scripts, and may be futher refined in the future.