The Beatles - Lonely Hearts, Rubber Soul & Magical...
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    The Beatles - Lonely Hearts, Rubber Soul & Magical Yellow Submarine Tour With this piece I really tried to visually capture the full range of Th… Read More
    The Beatles - Lonely Hearts, Rubber Soul & Magical Yellow Submarine Tour With this piece I really tried to visually capture the full range of The Beatles' music... from their early days of happy, pop, love songs to their later albums which were much more rock based with darker & more drug influenced lyrics. All of the words are song lyrics. And a lot of the imagery was inspired from/based on "Yellow Submarine" which is a 1968 British animated film based on the music of The Beatles, not to be confused with The Beatles' album with the same title (the album Yellow Submarine was a soundtrack for the film). If you have not seen this film you NEED to! It was soooo ahead of it's time. To give you an idea of the inspiration behind this piece... You will see a walrus sitting on a mushroom smoking a hookah (which is a waterpipe) Here is how that imagery came about. When John Lennon wrote the lyrics to the song "I Am The Walrus" he based it on the poem "The Walrus And The Carpenter" by Lewis Carroll. Lewis Carroll is best know for writing Alice's Adventures In Wonderland. In Alice in Wonderland there is a part where Alice comes across a caterpillar sitting on a mushroom smoking a hookah... soooo, the walrus on the mushroom smoking the hookah is born and that is how it all ties together. You will also notice the phrase "Goo Goo G'Joob" next to the walrus, this phrase is used in the song, "I Am The Walrus". As far as the meaning to this phrase, Urban Dictionary.com says the following, "This phrase has absolutely no definitive meaning given by dictionaries or artists such as John Lennon who first used it. The phrase has two other widely known spellings: coo coo ca choo and kukukachu. It is believed to be used in songs and in 60s and 70s slang as a phrase left to be freely interpreted by anyone based on the surrounding context it is used in. The freedom to betsow any meaning upon the phrase makes the word a statement about freedom of expression, which is a meaning in itself. Another widely accepted variation of the meaning is a slang way to assure the state of things is entirely fine; an expression of reassuring goodness." (interesting side note: this phrase has also been used in "That 70's Show" & "Finding Nemo".) The more you are familiar with The Beatles, their music and Yellow Submarine (The FILM) the more you will understand and appreciate the symbolism in this piece. Read Less
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The Beatles - Lonely Hearts, Rubber Soul & Magical Yellow Submarine Tour
The Beatles - Lonely Hearts, Rubber Soul & Magical Yellow Submarine Tour