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    Reading Gallup’s article a week ago about the percentage of the LGBT people in the largest United States metropolitan areas warranted a little ti… Read More
    Reading Gallup’s article a week ago about the percentage of the LGBT people in the largest United States metropolitan areas warranted a little time on an infographic. With other client projects going on lately, it’s been ages since I took a few minutes with Netflix in the background to enjoy some data visualization. I added another set of data to contrast—a simple breakdown of LGBT rights per state as they stand. I can understand that some of these are more complicated in implementation than a graphic can easily convey, but the cover marriage equality, same-sex adoption, anti-discrimination laws for housing and employment, and hate crime laws. I also added a little data in terms of a translation of percentages to rough ratios and the total numbers those percentages calculate to. I went a few rounds with the design, though I have to create some kind of deadline for myself (what? you think I have nothing else to do?). Opting for some decorative floral data points—thinking of the color and lively expression of Pride. As far as the data is concerned, San Francisco lives up to its stereotype, but having Salt Lake City in the top ten for its higher ratio was a bit of a surprise, even to some of us living here. I appreciated the Gallup report’s header photo of SLC locals Derek Kitchen and Moudi Sbeity, plaintiffs in Utah’s same-sex marriage lawsuit that it seems started a domino effect for the country. It’s interesting to note that the report is self-reporting, and though there isn’t as much stigma over being gay as there used to be, a conservative area like Utah might possibly be underreporting in contrast to the larger cities. Still, 1.1% higher than national average for one of the reddest states in the country is pretty interesting. Some standouts are fun—Austin in conservative Texas, New Orleans compared to the rest of the South, and Louisville, Kentucky. Also noting Pittsburgh—scene of Queer as Folk as one of the lowest, and the contrast of San Francisco to San Jose. Looks like there’s a pretty good shift westward in the percentages, contrasting with the Midwest particularly. The western and New England States also have more rights legalized. Maybe the Pet Shop Boys were prophetic—Go West is a gay anthem, after all. Read Less
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