Serbian Mythology (book illustrations)
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Bibin – Poetics of Absence
 
I am quite certain that Dragan Bibin intends to move on from illustration itself by expanding it to unimagined limits. Paradoxically he does so by almost synesthetically involving the spectator into the calm and isolated regions of the depicted, even when they depict someone’s face, the ravaged geography of the forehead and cheeks lined with wrinkles, withered lips and the opaque darkness of deep waters perceived in the eyes.
Thus, the punctum of a portrait of a drowned man is the point where the velvety wings and legs of a white vampiress, a nocturnal butterfly, touch the cold human skin of the drowned man; on the other painting it is the point where the fingers and palms touch the glass of a window. Those hands are outside, in the night and the dark while the bright space of happiness is inside, on the other side of the glass. The man is now a moth bewitched by light. Later there is an unexpected turn of events: a dog gazing into the dark night through a half open door from an empty bright room. It is up to the spectator to fill the night with his/her own fears and the dog is just a guide between worlds.
     Dragan Bibin is a quiet and secretive master of primordial fear and an absence that arouses a shudder of dread. When the wind scatters the pauper’s bags and one of them flutters and flaps in the wind, hanging from a bare branch, fluttering like a cynical flag, a standard of shattered hopes, one can not help but ask – where their owners are, the men and women who carried them, who kept the trinkets of their lives in them.
     The so-called learned will say pars pro toto and will prattle on maybe about immortality, eternal life but the answer is simple, unavoidable: They are scattered to the winds.
     That is what Bibin achieves by painting just one ordinary, torn pauper’s bag. In the wind.
 
Milenko Bodirogić
oil on panel, 80x100 cm
 
When I was five years old, maybe even younger, in the middle of the night a mysterious hand appeared pressed to the window. Just a palm of some passer-by who leaned on it, long enough for me to see it, not long enough for anyone else to notice. At that age, my rational thinking was not developed enough to perceive the bright white palm surrounded by the deepest darkness giving it a mysterious, frightening dimension. 
oil on panel, 100x80 cm
 
The tragic death of Divna is felt in the landscape that surrounds her. She rests on a stump, a symbolic representation of her death in contrast with four large, strong, high-standing trees. Her body is straight, like a tree trunk struck by lightning in a storm. Lying on a cold, wet ground, as she holds two poppies, both of whom are pulled out by the roots, to represent the eternal death of a flower that will never blossom again.
oil on panel, 35x50 cm
 
An allegorical representation of an infectious disease, and its presence in our lives. The personification of Plague, stands in the field looking down on an innocent boy. He is sensing a kind of danger, while his dog is curiously looking at something. The Plague is announcing her intention trough the trail of Ladybugs, passing on from the standing figure onto the boy’s hand, while they resemble sores because of their red color. The unpredictability of the disease and the hidden presence of it in our lives makes it even more frightening.
oil on gessoed cotton paper, 56x76 cm
 
Plague When you just see her, you already feel sick. First symptoms are blurred vision and nausea...
egg tempera on true gesso panel, 35x50 cm
INSTRUCTION FOR SEEING OMAYA: Concentrate on the blood stain in the middle of the picture, on the handkerchief, for about 20 seconds. Take a look at a wall near you. Than start blinking your eyes and you will see a true Omaya emerging. 
oil on linen, 30x40 cm
 
“Vampir”, the Serbian word, is one of rare words that is widely accepted in languages around the world. The genuine Vampire is native to the Serbian and Balkan culture. The first “official” records of vampitism were reported to have happened in Serbia, so the book describes this Slavic mythological being, and the Vampire that is quite different than its Western versions.
oil on canvas, 15x20 cm
egg tempera on true gesso panel, 35x50 cm
egg tempera on true gesso panel, 35x50 cm
oil on panel, 24x35 cm
Serbian Mythology (book illustrations)
2217
20262
153
Published:

Serbian Mythology (book illustrations)

Some of my illustrations for five-volume series about Serbian mythology published by "Orfelin izdavaštvo”, Novi Sad. All were painted from 2009 t Read More
2217
20262
153
Published:

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