Trap: A Critique of Modern Foods
This series aims to explore the trap of things that claim to nourish us but end up doing just the opposite. 
If the situation Lispon and Kurman describe, of having all our foods 3D printed, makes you hesistant about the future of our food -- you are not alone. Every day we are told about the harms of artificial sweeteners, colours, and flavours, and there always seems to be one more thing to add to the neverending list of dangers. Even if a 3D printed food item were to be an organic, low-sugar muffin, how healthy could something be if it has just been processed from a cartridge and printed from a machine? 3D printed meals may arrive somewhere in our not-so-distant future, but the reality is that the dangers don't end with obvious artifical foods and flavours. In recent years many of the so-called "healthy" foods we eat have begun to undergo further scrutiny. We all know that junk food will harm us, but what do we do when research states that certain "healthy" foods are causing damage as well?
THE MYTH OF THE "HEALTHY" AISLE
 
Orange juice, low-fat yogurt, granola bars and dried fruit are all examples of items that we consider to be good for us. We bring them in our lunches and feel satisfied with them as our healthy afternoon snacks, but recently these nutritious ideals have come under question. Hidden underneath the organic labels and healthy-living advertising is a damning layer of research arguing conclusions such as that a glass of orange juice a day has been connected to high blood pressure (1), that dairy products have been linked to osteoporosis (2), and eating an egg a day is worse than smoking (3). Conventional wisdom has been turned on its head, but solutions haven't arisen from the fog. Ultimately, where do we turn when there is so much conflicting research on almost every item of food that we eat? We are left in a predicament where the food we eat hurts us, but at the same time we can't just stop eating. This series aims to explore the trap of the things that claim to nourish us but end up doing just the opposite. 
 
CONCEPT - A SPOON THAT SUBVERTS EATING
 
These spoons won't let us eat our food, and are therefore in themselves a trap. In our bowls they look like ordinary spoons, but once lifted up all of their liquid drains right out and falls back into the bowl. If anything remains in the spoon, the spider or snake gets in the way of consuming it. The spoons will not let us nourish ourselves, and in so doing symbolise the foods that claim to nourish us but will not. 
3D Printed Version
Trap: A Critique of Modern Foods
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Trap: A Critique of Modern Foods

For our 3D printing class I designed an art object series that highlights the trap of modern foods.
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Published: