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    Ornamental Tectonics is a tri-monthly exploration that serves as a graphic and physical component of theoretical and historical architectural res… Read More
    Ornamental Tectonics is a tri-monthly exploration that serves as a graphic and physical component of theoretical and historical architectural research. The project grew from a desire to contextualize, test, experiment, and explore architectural history through the act of design, rather than strictly through reading and writing academic papers. Essentially, I try to quantify the images, modes of production, tectonic ideas, and representations from ancient drawings, and imagine how those systems and ideas could be further explored using the tools of the post post-modern digital world. In its most basic theoretical context, these creations are explorations, and not literal proposals; they are ornamental in their very nature. My interest in antiquity doesn’t stem from contempt of modernism (quite the opposite), rather from a deep curiosity of lost knowledge, cultures, and ideas. Read Less
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Ornamental Tectonics is a tri-monthly exploration that serves as a graphic and physical component of theoretical and historical architectural research. The project grew from a desire to contextualize, test, experiment, and explore architectural history through the act of design, rather than strictly through reading and writing academic articles.
 
- Pavilion 01 -  
Resulting from the manifestation of a number of western historical influences, pavilion 01 essentially arose from the idea of extruding the profile shape of a molding around a non-uniform object.  The resulting extrusion could then be further defined using a modified method of vaulting. 
-Pavilion 02-
The concept behind pavilion 02 was to explore the tectonic principals exhibited in Pompeian wall painting using three-dimensional modules rather than a drafted design.  Pompeian wall paintings don’t exhibit typical perspective, but they can be studied and broken down into quadrants, as well as blocks of foreground/ background elements. Once the 3d modules were defined, the pavilion was created in elevation and section.