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    For this week's project learning 3D art, I decided to celebrate a friend of mine who contributed a lot to the SVG standard, as he just retired. I… Read More
    For this week's project learning 3D art, I decided to celebrate a friend of mine who contributed a lot to the SVG standard, as he just retired. I tried to capture the ups and downs (see the stairs) of creating a Web standard (not an easy feat) and the fact that it is "a-maze-ing" (ah, ah, poor geek joke, hence the maze-like composition) and that now the standard is well established, this is something to contemplate, like the figure does in the middle, and reflect on a job well done. Read Less
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What is this project about?
This week's project is to celebrate a friend of mine who contributed a lot to the SVG standard, as he just retired. I tried to capture the ups and downs (see the stairs) of creating a Web standard (not an easy feat) and the fact that it is "a-maze-ing" (ah, ah, poor geek joke, hence the maze-like composition) and that now the standard is well established, this is something to contemplate, like the figure does in the middle, and reflect on a job well done.
 
Asia plays a big role in my friend's life, and I have chosen the Nihon font to write "SVG" in 3D, as this font mimicks Japanese typography to render western type.
How was it created?
Inspiration
 
I really like the work that Lex Wilson does and decided to create a look inspired by his work, like the 3D typography in this project.
 
Modelling
I used Illustrator, Cinema 4D and a Photoshop to create the composition. I created the inital layout in Illustrator, as shown below.
I then used the vectors in Cinema 4D and extruded the various path to create the composition. Below is one of the early steps, creating an extruded plane from the geometry created in Illustrator.
 Since I am learning Cinema 4D, I tried a number of things to build up the stairs. I ended up creating stairs with the clone tool that I 'removed' from the extruded geometry.
The 'inverted' stairs (gray) are removed from the base geometry (white) using a boolean operation.
Resulting shape after the boolean operation is applied.
Final stairs after editing the geometry to remove the oddities.
Rendering
For the rendering, after multiple experiments, I ended up using VRay for the shading and the regular Cinema 4D renderer for the lines and ambient occlusions (AO) (even though I did not use AO in the final rendering) and then did the final compositing in Photoshop.
 
The following images show the different compositing steps: sketch only, sketch and AO, plain shading (with VRay), and finally, composited result with color adjustments.
Renderings from different view points