This street art installation is the latest in Adobe’s Random Acts of Creativity series and celebrates the work of San Francisco street artist APEX, also known as Ricardo Richey.
 
The installation is located at Proxy, the acclaimed two-block project that mobilizes a flexible environment of food, art, culture, and retail within renovated shipping containers (located at the corner of Octavia and Hayes in San Francisco’s Hayes Valley). A 20’ x 9’ temporary wall was constructed to showcase APEX’s work.
 
Teaser Wall the week before installation:
On the day the wall was revealed, the entire mural was covered with 1000 2’ X 2’ posters on a 4 x 10 grid, all inspired by APEX’s previous work in the city.
Visitors were invited to take a free piece of art and when they peeled their selection off the wall, it revealed another one behind it. Once all 25 posters in that quadrant were taken, a section of APEX’s mural was revealed. Throughout the day, the entire wall was revealed and 1000 visitors took home a piece of FREE ART.
APEX’s mural is on display through the end of the year and then will be donated. Adobe and APEX are working with local non-profit SF Beautiful to find a permanent home for the mural.
What APEX had to say about his inspiration and process for the creation of the mural:
 
"In my work I take into consideration the environment that it will live in. The Hayes Valley neighborhood at the intersection of Octavia and Hayes has a lot of activity. I wanted a piece that played well with that activity as well as, could hold the passerby eye. The mural needed to have a lot of color and layers to accomplish this. Once I knew what I needed to do I just had to paint it. 
 
The actual painting process is very normal to mural making in art history.  I start out with a sketch and then I begin to fill in with colors. I start to add designs and more layers until I feel it's ready for the final outline. After the final outline is applied I look to see what areas need corrections. After the corrections are made the mural is complete."