In 2013 I've had a chance to visit Morocco for few days. It's been a short but  intense journey that left me the desire to discover the deeper nature of a country so close to Italy, just on the other side of the Mediterranean.
Also having worked as NGO volunteer with unaccompanied foreign minors, many of them coming to Italy from Maghreb, I'm mostly interested in social aspects of modern muslim societies.
These photos are a first approach to their day living, an attempt to focus on people and detatils, without the distraction of full-frame format. Maybe a second trip will bring back colors too.
 
The project A tale of Morocco has also been submitted to LensCulture Emerging Talent Awards 2014, deserving a special mention and a chance at global exposure to their audience through a free invitation-only Portfolio Account (visible at https://www.lensculture.com/projects/35983-a-tale-of-morocco). On 2015 it has been also submitted to Lugano Photo Days photo contest which will take place on next October (fingers crossed)!
Bismillah
Arabization is still an ongoing process in Marocco. Madrasas and Islamic Universities had a central role in spreading Islam throughout native Berber population. Al-Karaouine is one of the oldest madrasa of the Muslim world and has historically been one of their leading spiritual and educational centers. Walls of the internal court are richly decorated with stucco arabesques and quotes from the Koran.
Fez
When approaching the tannery the smell is the first suggestion that something different is about to appear. Composed of numerous stone vessels filled with a vast range of dyes and various odorous liquids, this tannery is one of the oldest in the world.  The production is still all achieved manually, without the need for modern machinery. Men often work in unbearably hot conditions.
The Wealth of Nation
When approaching the tannery the smell is the first suggestion that something different is about to appear. Composed of numerous stone vessels filled with a vast range of dyes and various odorous liquids, this tannery is one of the oldest in the world.  The production is still all achieved manually, without the need for modern machinery. Men often work in unbearably hot conditions.
Shoefiti
Europe has long been a destination for a large diaspora, with Moroccans arriving in some countries at least as early as the twentieth century. Sometimes, they come back too, bringing new influences and a glimpse of more western culture.
Watch out
Prior to the spread of Islam into Morocco, which brought along with it the Arab conquest, Morocco was part of a region inhabited mostly by a non-Arab Amazigh population. Various Amazigh tribes are noted to be matrilineal, such as the Tuareg tribes of North Africa. As such, women hold significant roles still today in local communities and it's not unusual for them to be more emancipated than the Muslim standard.
Symmetry
Zelliges craftmanship and tiling are among the most important traditions of Maghreb. In the surroundings of Fez, there are many small laboratories where craftsmen work with terracotta, producing manually tiled tables, fountains and decorations. Tesserae (or furmah) are assembled in geometric schemas, developed throughout centuries by maalems (master craftsmen).
Souk
Although today permanent souks maintain traditional division into specialized sections, dealing in specific types of product, it's becoming increasingly difficult to find original and locally-crafted products, often substituted by chinese products.
Woman at work
In 622 BC, as Islam arrived in Morocco, the women of Morocco received three basic rights under the Muslims' religion: the right to live, the right to be honored and to be respected as a mother, and the right to own business and be able to work. Today is not unusual for many of them to group togheter into cooperatives to strengthen their social and working position.
Night sun
Many arabesque patterns disappear at (or "under" as it often appears to a viewer) a framing edge without ending, and thus can be regarded as infinitely extendable outside the space they actually occupy; this was certainly a distinctive feature of the Islamic form, though not without precedent.
Childhood
Teachers and parents believing children should fear them to work and behave better, violence is often socially-accepted and approved. Respect for the views of the child remains limited owing to traditional societal attitudes towards children on the part of schools, courts, administrative bodies and, especially, the family. A large number of children are vulnerable, especially children born out of wedlock and children with disabilities.
Marrakech
Jemaa el-Fnaa is the center of city activity and trades, always crowded from early in the morning 'till late at night. A vivid image of what is considered to be modern in actual Morocco.
Along the road
«There is no way back, cross or die» is a known motto for irregular moroccan migrants. In the last 30 years, Morocco has experienced enormous migration movements from the rural areas. Anyone who is trying to migrate abroad in an irregular way calls himself "harraq", which means "to burn", as in "to burn ties" When used to describe children, the term "harraq" implies that these children are in the street as a temporary position in time and space.
When they finally reach Europe and find their path to a new living and financial indipendence, ties with their family are the first to be established again.
Sahara
Western Sahara is a disputed territory  and one of the most sparsely populated territories in the world, mainly consisting of desert flatlands. Although 2/3 of the area is under moroccan control, SADR has recently gathered UN international recognition and its demand for independence is becoming a compelling question for the young moroccan king, Muhammad VI.
A tale of Morocco
4
107
0
Published:

A tale of Morocco

In 2013 I've had a chance to visit Morocco for few days. It's been a short but intense journey that left me the desire to discover the deeper nat Read More
4
107
0
Published:

Tools

Creative Fields