• Add to Collection
  • Tools Used
  • About

    About

    Co-hosted with Aaron Koblin, Data Artist and Creative Director of the Data Arts group in Google's Creative Lab, Floating Pixels was a one-day wor… Read More
    Co-hosted with Aaron Koblin, Data Artist and Creative Director of the Data Arts group in Google's Creative Lab, Floating Pixels was a one-day workshop that brought together MIT students and researchers to explore scanning technology. Inspired by Aaron’s previous work on Radiohead’s video “House of Cards,” which used light scanning to digitally capture lead singer Thom York and landscape scenes, participants of Floating Pixels built their own low-tech, portable structured light scanners to pixelate their faces with Processing. By simply connecting a mini-projector, webcam and IPhone, a structured-light scanner is assembled and real-world objects are ready to be captured in 3D and manipulated with software. The mini-projector projects a series of horizontal line patterns of light using images uploaded on the IPhone. The webcam is offset slightly from the mini-projector, it looks at the shape deformations of the line pattern and uses a technique similar to triangulation to calculate the distance of every point of the line pattern. Lastly, an algorithm is used to calculate the distance at each point in the pattern to form a digital 3D replication of the scanned object. Today, scanning technology is miniaturizing and developing at a rapid pace, allowing us to digitally capture more objects thtan ever before at lower costs. In the near future, smartphones with micro-projectors will be developed, becoming a natural step towards 3D scanners that can travel with us in our pockets. Read Less
    Published:
Co-hosted with Aaron Koblin, Data Artist and Creative Director of the Data Arts group in Google's Creative Lab, Floating Pixels was a one-day workshop that brought together MIT students and researchers to explore scanning technology. Inspired by Aaron’s previous work on Radiohead’s video “House of Cards,” which used light scanning to digitally capture lead singer Thom York and landscape scenes, participants of Floating Pixels built their own low-tech, portable structured light scanners to pixelate their faces with Processing. By simply connecting a mini-projector, webcam and IPhone, a structured-light scanner is assembled and real-world objects are ready to be captured in 3D and manipulated with software. The mini-projector projects a series of horizontal line patterns of light using images uploaded on the IPhone. The webcam is offset slightly from the mini-projector, it looks at the shape deformations of the line pattern and uses a technique similar to triangulation to calculate the distance of every point of the line pattern. Lastly, an algorithm is used to calculate the distance at each point in the pattern to form a digital 3D replication of the scanned object. Today, scanning technology is miniaturizing and developing at a rapid pace, allowing us to digitally capture more objects thtan ever before at lower costs. In the near future, smartphones with micro-projectors will be developed, becoming a natural step towards 3D scanners that can travel with us in our pockets.
Floating Pixels
Video demo structured light scan.
Structured light scanner (webcam, micro-projector, Iphone).
Aaron Koblin & Doug Fritz test light scanner.
Captured images of student.